See what you missed as the SPIN Music Group launched with a bang at Los Angeles' Sonos Studio

1.Unmuted in L.A.

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Last night at Los Angeles' Sonos Studios, dream-punk purveyors Dum Dum Girls helped celebrate the launch of the SPIN Music Group with tracks from their latest Sub Pop EP End of Daze. That title may have been a bit of a misnomer, however, as they brought with them a heady, narcotic swoon that grabbed the audience by the brain pan and pushed and pulled until we submitted to the thickly chorded lilt. Singer Dee Dee (pictured above) played the part — wan but fierce, dark but commanding — while her three accompanying sirens worked their black magic from the small stage. They looked devilish up there but were hardly unkind, dolling out one taffy-tough lump of garage-rock candy after another. When they wrapped, it seemed altogether too soon, like waking from an afternoon nap.

White Arrows opened with their trademark blend of new tech and old soul. The Los Angeles natives hacked out their own path between the multi-culti guitar-pop dalliances of Vampire Weekend and the psych-dance detours of Miike Snow to deliver a performance that transcended the space — and perhaps space, the concept, as well. Standing in front of a projector screen loaded with trippy triangles, and wearing all manner of patterns that collectively could be described as tropi-flage, the band well represented singer Mickey Church's background in shamanistic studies. They led the crowd on a booze-fueled spirit quest that dropped us off somewhere far from the hustle and bustle of L.A.'s busy La Brea Avenue. CHRIS MARTINS

2.Unmuted in L.A.

2/16

Last night at Los Angeles' Sonos Studios, dream-punk purveyors Dum Dum Girls helped celebrate the launch of the SPIN Music Group with tracks from their latest Sub Pop EP End of Daze. That title may have been a bit of a misnomer, however, as they brought with them a heady, narcotic swoon that grabbed the audience by the brain pan and pushed and pulled until we submitted to the thickly chorded lilt. Singer Dee Dee (pictured above) played the part — wan but fierce, dark but commanding — while her three accompanying sirens worked their black magic from the small stage. They looked devilish up there but were hardly unkind, dolling out one taffy-tough lump of garage-rock candy after another. When they wrapped, it seemed altogether too soon, like waking from an afternoon nap.

White Arrows opened with their trademark blend of new tech and old soul. The Los Angeles natives hacked out their own path between the multi-culti guitar-pop dalliances of Vampire Weekend and the psych-dance detours of Miike Snow to deliver a performance that transcended the space — and perhaps space, the concept, as well. Standing in front of a projector screen loaded with trippy triangles, and wearing all manner of patterns that collectively could be described as tropi-flage, the band well represented singer Mickey Church's background in shamanistic studies. They led the crowd on a booze-fueled spirit quest that dropped us off somewhere far from the hustle and bustle of L.A.'s busy La Brea Avenue. CHRIS MARTINS

3.Dum Dum Girls

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4.Dum Dum Girls

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5.Dum Dum Girls

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6.Dum Dum Girls

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7.Unmuted Crowd

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8.Fitz of Fitz & the Tantrums grabs a Dum Dum Girl

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9.White Arrows

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10.White Arrows

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11.White Arrows

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12.White Arrows

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13.Unmuted Crowd

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14.Unmuted Crowd

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15.Unmuted at the Sonos Studio (with help from Patron)

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16.Unmuted Crowd

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