Reviews - Page 9

Review: On ÷, Ed Sheeran Is More Than Just Pop’s Sheepish Nice Guy

No modern mainstream musician represents the friend zone more than Ed Sheeran, who was introduced to the United States as Taylor Swift’s grinning, ginger teddy…
Jeremy Gordon / March 7, 2017

Review: Arcade Fire – Neon Bible

This review of Arcade Fire's Neon Bible first ran in the March 2007 issue of Spin, and we're republishing it here to mark the…
Josh Modell / March 6, 2017

Review: Xiu Xiu’s FORGET Finds New Territory Through Collaboration

Fifteen years into the project’s existence, a new Xiu Xiu record comes with certain expectations. Tinny synths and drum machines will grow from sparse arrangements,…
Rob Arcand / March 1, 2017

Review: Kingdom’s Tears in the Club Is an Uneven Release From a Brilliant Producer

"What Is Love," the opening track of Kingdom’s debut full-length album Tears in the Club, immediately establishes itself as a highlight of his catalog. It…
Andy Cush / February 24, 2017

Review: On Why Love Now, Pissed Jeans Explore the Lighter Side of Everyday Agony

The world of heavy guitar music isn’t known for its sense of humor. You have your bearded metalheads, singing about wizards and spending Friday evenings…
Andy Cush / February 24, 2017

Review: David Bowie’s No Plan Is a Fond, Final Glimpse at a Departed Master

David Bowie’s death did not transform ★ into a brave, lovely, often great album. (Whether 2013’s The Next Day…
Alfred Soto / February 23, 2017

Review: Future Suddenly Comes Alive On Surprise Album FUTURE

One good thing to come from capitalism is rap music, and into the lineage of the art form’s greatest moguls—Master P, Puff Daddy, Jay Z,…
Jordan Sargent / February 22, 2017

Review: Ryan Adams’ Prisoner Reveals a Man Comfortable With Heartbreak

Ryan Adams' new record Prisoner is, thematically, a record of dissolution. In various interviews, Adams has affirmed the connection between the album and…
Brad Shoup / February 17, 2017

Review: Bing & Ruth’s No Home of the Mind Wrings Joy and Heartbreak Out of the Piano

For David Moore, the piano was always most important. As a student at the New School’s contemporary music department, Moore spun the measured minimalism of…
Rob Arcand / February 17, 2017

Review: Jens Lekman Is Still Yours Truly on Life Will See You Now

What is a Jens Lekman? It doesn’t come in any of the usual colors or shapes. It bristles with complicated angles and mechanisms. It’s hard…
Brian Howe / February 16, 2017

Review: Matt Jencik’s Weird Times Is Ambient Music for the Impending Apocalypse

Weird Times, the title of the debut solo album by journeyman experimental musician Matt Jencik, contains an uncommon politicization of a word that usually brings…
Andy Cush / February 10, 2017

Review: Blur – Blur

This piece first ran in the February 1997 issue of Spin. In honor of the album turning 20 this year, and our feature on the…
Jonathan Bernstein / February 10, 2017

Review: Julie Byrne’s Not Even Happiness Is a Truly Beautiful Travel Album

Sometimes, simply pairing the right voice with the right reverb can create a song’s power. There have been endless notable examples since the effect came…
Winston Cook-Wilson / February 7, 2017

Review: Allison Crutchfield Finds Her Own Way on Solo Debut Tourist in This Town

Allison Crutchfield’s first full-length album as a solo artist opens with a resigned and comforting sigh. It’s a prologue that sounds like an elegy: "When…
Anna Gaca / February 3, 2017

Review: Sampha Finds Beauty Within the Process

In prior interviews, Sampha Sisay made it clear that he was content with being a supporting player, a lane in which he proved…
Brian Josephs / February 3, 2017
Page 9 of 414