Reviews - Page 8

Review: Arca’s Self-Titled Album Is His Most Engaging, Emotionally Draining, and Confrontational Record Yet

While Alejandro Ghersi already had amassed production credits ranging from FKA twigs and Kelela to Kanye by the time he turned 25, it was his…
Andy Beta / April 6, 2017

Review: Father John Misty’s Pure Comedy Isn’t as Interesting As His Persona

Josh Tillman, aka Father John Misty, is something of a rarity—a bona fide indie rock star in an era where the relevance of what we…
Jeremy Gordon / April 6, 2017

Review: Julia Holter’s Live Album In the Same Room Brings Out the Richest Qualities in Her Work

If you think about the lengthy tour cycles independent artists embark on these days--for either the love of doing so, or at least the love…
Winston Cook-Wilson / April 5, 2017

Review: On The Far Field, Future Islands Struggle With the Limits of Their Signature Sound

Future Islands practice a kind of synth-pop asceticism. Over four albums and eleven years, the beloved Baltimore band have worked exclusively with a…
Andy Cush / April 5, 2017

Review: Bob Dylan’s Sprawling Standards Album Triplicate Highlights His Idiosyncratic Charms

In the middle of the last century, pop vocal albums consisting of selections from the "Great American Songbook"--made-for-market pop tunes published between the late 1920s…
Winston Cook-Wilson / March 31, 2017

Review: Goldfrapp Aren’t Having Fun on Silver Eye, But Their Disco Dystopia Fits the Times

Somewhere between the throbbing second track on Goldfrapp's new album Silver Eye ("Systemagic") and the slinky third ("Tigerman"), you'll wonder why Goldfrapp haven't recorded a…
Anna Gaca / March 30, 2017

Review: The Jesus and Mary Chain Correct Their Course on the Satisfying Damage and Joy

Just think of the legacy of Jim and William Reid, the two brothers helming the Jesus and Mary Chain for more than 30 years of hurts-so-good…
Dale Eisinger / March 28, 2017

Review: On the Pummeling Heartless, Pallbearer Haven’t Softened

It’s taken Arkansas doom outfit Pallbearer just eight years to clamber out from the underground and onto the sacred dais we like to call "the…
Zoe Camp / March 24, 2017

Review: Sorority Noise Find New Strength in Grief on You’re Not As _____ As You Think

Coming from a genre notorious for glorifying teenage angst and spite-ridden suicide, Sorority Noise really only found themselves when they…
Rob Arcand / March 23, 2017

Review: ANOHNI’s Paradise Greets the Apocalypse With Indignation and Humility

The apocalypse will not arrive in a flash, but through the slow melting of ice, the smogging of clear skies, the rising of low seas…
Jeremy Gordon / March 22, 2017

Review: Real Estate Continue Their Blissful, Unhurried Quest for Inner Harmony on In Mind

For nearly a decade, Real Estate have made music as blissful and unhurried as a cat lolling about in a sunbeam. Their endless reserves of tranquility…
Jeremy Gordon / March 21, 2017

Review: The Thrilling More Life Makes a Compelling Argument For the Audacity of Drake

Pop music, at least its apex, is the province of the audacious, from Elvis twisting his hips, to Prince, Madonna, and Janet Jackson rearranging sexual…
Jordan Sargent / March 20, 2017

Review: Spoon Fully Embrace Artifice on the Kaleidoscopic Hot Thoughts

"Coconut milk, coconut water, you still like to tell me they’re the same--who am I to say?" Britt Daniel sings over disco-punk drums and a…
Andy Cush / March 17, 2017

Review: On Everybody Works, Jay Som Gracefully Masters the Art of Holding Back

Melina Duterte isn't a belter; she delivers lyrics like gentle mantras, as if their repetition might produce a self-induced hypnosis, encircling herself in a world of…
Anna Gaca / March 14, 2017

Review: On Heartworms, the Shins Move Past Boring Indie Rock Debates to Have Some Fun

The Shins’ fifth album, Heartworms, could not have arrived at a worse time, dropping as it has at the tail end of an biannual…
Brad Shoup / March 10, 2017
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