37 Superb TV Shows You Probably Haven’t Seen to Binge on Right Now

35 Superb TV Shows You Probably Haven’t Seen to Binge on Right Now
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Recent times have seen plenty of people stuck at home and searching for new entertainment options. Fortunately for them, we’re living in a golden age of television, and there’s an abundance of choice when it comes to great shows that you can catch up on. The growing range of streaming services provides access to some absolute gems, so here are 35 great shows that you probably haven’t seen yet.


Catastrophe (Prime Video)
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What if a brief fling resulted in an accidental pregnancy? It’s not an entirely new premise, but Catastrophe explores it with humor and sweetness. Sharon (Sharon Horgan) lives in London and meets Rob (Rob Delaney), an American who’s in town on a business trip. He returns home after a week, only to learn that she’s pregnant. The two decide to try to make their relationship work, and what follows is a perfect blend of observational comedy and character drama. Critics have highlighted the chemistry of the two leads, and it’s an easy show to get invested in. It also has the bonus of containing one of Carrie Fisher’s final performances.


Catastrophe (Prime Video)
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What if a brief fling resulted in an accidental pregnancy? It’s not an entirely new premise, but Catastrophe explores it with humor and sweetness. Sharon (Sharon Horgan) lives in London and meets Rob (Rob Delaney), an American who’s in town on a business trip. He returns home after a week, only to learn that she’s pregnant. The two decide to try to make their relationship work, and what follows is a perfect blend of observational comedy and character drama. Critics have highlighted the chemistry of the two leads, and it’s an easy show to get invested in. It also has the bonus of containing one of Carrie Fisher’s final performances.


The Comeback (HBO Max)
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The Comeback sees Friends star Lisa Kudrow playing Valerie Cherish, an actress attempting to find her way back to some modicum of fame by any means necessary. It’s not always easy watching (it’s been described as “the cruelest show about Hollywood”), but the close-to-the-bone commentary on showbiz is one of its greatest assets. Blurring the line between comedy and commentary, the series invites you to laugh and think in equal measure.


The Path (Hulu)
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This thought-provoking drama stars Breaking Bad’s Aaron Paul playing Eddie Lane, who has joined a small religious group along with his family. As the series unfolds, conflict steadily increases regarding exactly what’s going on behind the scenes in the community and whether it’s actually a cult. The show received accolades from critics for the quality of production as well as its analysis of religious practice.


The World According to Jeff Goldblum (Disney+)
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This Disney gem hasn’t quite gotten the fanfare of the high-octane action thrillers or moving relationship dramas, but it’s a lovely light-hearted documentary series helmed by the charming Jeff Goldblum. Fast-paced and colorful, the 30-minute episodes are informative and fun – or as Empire puts it, “There’s real happiness – and some actual facts – to be gleaned [here].”


The End of the F***ing World (Netflix)
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Two teenagers run away together. One is impulsive and loves to sulk, while the other is a psychopath. Alyssa (Jessica Barden) and James (Alex Lawther) play out a surprisingly sweet romance, with critics praising the abilities of the two leads to bring these strange characters to life. With episodes at about 20 minutes each, it’s also an easy show to dip in and out of.


Defending Jacob (Apple TV+)
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This crme drama follows a family shaken to its core by accusations that teenage Jacob has murdered a classmate. Jacob’s father (Chris Evans) is the Assistant DA assigned to handle the case – which naturally leads to rising tensions as questions are asked about Jacob’s involvement and how far the father might go to cover for him. Critics have commended the leads and called it “an addictive murder mystery with terrific performances, some chilling twists and turns – and a shocking finale.”


The OA (Netflix)
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As one of the more popular options on this list, the opening scene of this sci-fi thriller sees a woman weaving between cars on a bridge before throwing herself over the railing – and the show doesn’t let up from there. The cryptic series earned a rabid fanbase with its layered mysteries and received favorable comparisons to other shows, with critics noting “[It’s] Netflix’s strongest and strangest original production since Stranger Things.”


The Thick of It (Hulu)
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This U.K. series from Armando Ianucci is a bitingly satirical take on British politics starring Peter Capaldi as furious and foul-mouthed government fixer Malcolm Tucker. Known for coining terms such as “omnishambles,” it’s a fast-paced intelligent show and has proven to be eerily prescient with some of its storylines. There’s also a movie spin-off, In the Loop, which co-stars James Gandolfini.


F is for Family (Netflix)
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F is for Family centers on 1970s suburbanite Frank Murphy, and it’s loosely based on the childhood of the show’s co-creator and star, comedian Bill Burr. Rotten Tomatoes – which gives it an 84% fresh rating – sums up the critical consensus, noting that “while the humor relies on vulgarity, the strength of F is for Family is its substantial heart.”


Killing Eve (Hulu)
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This darkly comic spy thriller sees assassin Villanelle (Jodie Comer) and MI5 agent Eve (Sandra Oh) chasing each other around the world, all with a strong will-they-won’t-they dynamic. Critics have praised the stylish photography and the show’s endless ability to surprise. Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge served as head writer for the first season, and – particularly with her next venture being co-writing the next Bond movie – she’s becoming one of the most celebrated creative talents of our time.


Normal People (Hulu)
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Adapted from Sally Rooney’s critically acclaimed book, the show follows protagonists Connell (Paul Mescal) and Marianne (Daisy Edgar-Jones) as they navigate their lives together and feelings for one another. It’s been described as a thoughtful and moving story as well as a highly faithful translation from book to screen. If you’re a fan of complicated and emotionally fraught relationship dramas, it’s definitely worth checking out.


The Night Manager (Prime Video)
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Based on a novel by John le Carré, this intelligent spy thriller sees Tom Hiddleston playing the titular manager, who is caught up in the affairs of an arms dealer (Hugh Laurie). Featuring a globetrotting plot, beautiful women and international crime, The Atlantic best describes the show as “the world’s most elaborate audition tape for 007.” Hiddleston’s performance has also received praise, with his energy and drive establishing the whole tone of the series.


Succession (Prime Video)
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As one of Amazon’s more successful forays into TV, Succession follows the affairs of a corporate dynasty that is strikingly reminiscent of Rupert Murdoch and his family (but different enough to stave off the lawyers). Created by writer Jesse Armstrong (The Thick of It), the show’s dialogue is as sharp and profane as you might expect and comes with a whole host of powerful performances from stars like Brian Cox, Kieran Culkin, Matthew Macfadyen and Sarah Snook.


Central Park (Apple TV+)
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Coming from the creators of Bob’s BurgersCentral Park is a musical comedy that stars a family who lives in the middle of New York’s Central Park because father Owen Tillerman (Leslie Odom Jr.), manages the park and wants them to share his passion for nature. The series comes with an impressive cast – also featuring Kristen Bell, Tituss Burgess and Kathryn Hahn – and, as one critic put it, “There’s just no resisting that kind of unbridled enthusiasm.”


For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
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Following the success of some of the other “alternate history” shows, this series puts viewers in a world where the Soviet Union was the first power to put a man on the moon. It shows women getting a larger role in NASA much earlier than our timeline and has received praise for its strong characterization as one of the best original shows that Apple has launched so far.


Last Chance U (Netflix)
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This documentary follows East Mississippi Community College’s football team, the Lions, for a real-life look at the highs and lows of college athletics. The twist is that these athletes essentially have one last shot to escape their difficult pasts, which can make for a highly engaging series regardless of interest in football. It’s powerful stuff, as one critic wrote “The end of the series is nothing less than Shakespearean.”


Veep (HBO Max)
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Have a lot of people watched Veep? Sure, but not nearly enough. Starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, the political satire turns an unflattering eye on life in the White House as it transposes profane, hilarious, and rapid-fire dialogue into the world of The West Wing. Considering the state of modern politics, it occasionally stands as borderline prophetic in addition to being a great watch.


Orphan Black (Prime Video)
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This dark, twisting sci-fi drama kicks off with English con-artist Sarah (Tatiana Maslany) witnessing the death of a woman who looks exactly like her. Maslany plays numerous characters – many of whom often appear onscreen simultaneously – so it’s only fair that she won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in 2016. Despite the off-the-wall clone-filled premise, critics have praised the show as offering a surprisingly grounded look at identity.


The Staircase (Netflix)
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Widower Michael Peterson claimed that his wife Kathleen had fallen down the stairs – but he found himself on trial for her murder. The expansive true crime documentary presents a twisting narrative that explores all angles of the story. In light of this mammoth undertaking, director Jean-Xavier de Lestrade (who also advised producers of Making A Murderer) has been hailed as “the godfather of the modern longform documentary.”


Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet (Apple TV+)
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This workplace comedy focuses on a video game development team in the process of creating an expansion for a (fictional) online RPG. The team is dysfunctional, the work frequently ridiculous, and there’s plenty of common ground to be found with shows like The Office. The series is also notably more concerned with interpersonal relationships rather than video games, so it’s been described as a “comedy surprise you can’t miss” regardless of your feelings on gaming.


George Lopez, Peacock
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George Lopez has been in a number of classic shows, and most of them have been about himself in one way or another. Perhaps the 100+ episodes of his self-titled show are the comedian at his finest though, as the mid-2000s sitcom walks the balance between being ridiculous and relatable in every season.


Search Party (HBO Max)
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