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California State Assemblymember Responds to Budget With Spotify Playlist

Randy Voepel represents California’s 71st Assembly district and roped in Jamie Foxx, the Rolling Stones and Justin Bieber to help make his statement.

Last month a teenage girl broke up with a guy she was seeing by making him an unconventional Spotify playlist that spelled out a “let’s see other people” message via its song titles. It went viral, inspiring more playlists of similar sorts, including now one by a 66-year-old freshman Republican California state assemblymember.

Randy Voepel (or, really, someone on his staff), who represents much of inland San Diego County and part of Riverside County, on Thursday shared a playlist responding to Governor Jerry Brown’s “May Revise” state budget proposal. Very much like that teenager’s it’s pretty effective way of getting the message across, while roping the likes of Jamie Foxx, Porter Robinson, The Shins and many more into the whole thing.

If you read the whole thing out, it states, “Unpredictable revenue cycles typically hurt the general fund over time. Accordingly, the state must be more responsible when we are spending money. You can’t always get what you want. We must prioritize key services, which will address primary Golden State needs. We can’t go on and on year after year allowing a tax bait and switch on ordinary people. In the meantime, I will always continue working with colleagues so we can make California better.” But if you listen to it, then Justin Bieber, Blake Shelton and the Rolling Stones are delivering the message for Voepal.

LAist spoke with Voepel’s chief of staff, Mason Herron, who said, “My boss likes to be different and he likes to do different things, and with that in mind, I applied that to the social media approach.”

It’s probably worth pointing out, though, aside from “more Spotify playlists” California’s 71st Assembly district assemblyman has some other arguably more questionable beliefs regarding policy and otherwise. Among them, he has said that global warming is a good thing because “most of our enemies live in hot climates, desert climates,” as he told The Guardian last year.

This article originally appeared on Billboard.