American music and marijuana have blazed a long trail together. We chart the 30 biggest Billboard hits to separate the seeds from the stems.

1. Because We Got High

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American music and marijuana have blazed a long trail together: The drug's earliest recorded use occurred about a century ago in New Orleans, the same time and place that birthed jazz. Since then, Mary Jane has been a ubiquitous accessory to just about every musical movement besides straight-edge. But some musicians are more vocal about their habit than others, often dedicating songs or — in the case of Sublime and Bongzilla — entire careers to smoking up. Rapper Wiz Khalifa is the biggest new star of the past couple of years to wave the flag proudly, even naming his 2011 breakthrough album Rolling Papers. As he prepares follow-up O.N.I.F.C. for a fall release, we decided to take a look at the mainstreaming of pot in pop music, charting the 30 biggest hits on Billboard's Hot 100 about the good herb.

Surprisingly, some of music's most famous weed lovers have never dedicated a hit single to their drug of choice — not even Cheech & Chong (although pot definitely assisted the creation of "Earache My Eye" and the audience that made it a Top 20 hit). Toby Keith released a single called "Weed With Willie," but Willie Nelson himself mostly kept the stash in the tour bus. The Grateful Dead, who probably helped facilitate more parking lot dimebag transactions than any touring act ever, reserved the drug references in their hits ("Casey Jones," "Truckin'") for cocaine. Plus many musicians mention the ubiquitous leaf without celebrating it: Rob Base didn't smoke buddha, couldn't stand cess; and Merle Haggard asserted that "We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee."

No comprehensive list of weed songs would be complete without Peter Tosh's "Legalize It" or Black Sabbath's "Sweet Leaf," but neither cracked the Hot 100. And Cab Calloway's "Reefer Man" and Ella Fitzgerald's "Cow Cow Boogie" predate the chart entirely. But pot has had its sticky green fingers all over pop music since the '60s, and hip-hop has only brought it further into the spotlight (although this list is actually devoid of music from the "Just Say No" '80s). To keep our bong-hit parade shorter than 420 songs, we primarily included tunes where the THC content was especially high in the chorus or constituted the overall theme, filtering out the countless rap hits where weed just makes a 2 Chainz-style cameo. Sadly, that means neglecting memorable couplets like Lil Boosie's "Smoking on that purple / Famous like the Ninja Turtles," but at some point you have to separate the seeds from the stems. AL SHIPLEY

2. Because We Got High

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American music and marijuana have blazed a long trail together: The drug's earliest recorded use occurred about a century ago in New Orleans, the same time and place that birthed jazz. Since then, Mary Jane has been a ubiquitous accessory to just about every musical movement besides straight-edge. But some musicians are more vocal about their habit than others, often dedicating songs or — in the case of Sublime and Bongzilla — entire careers to smoking up. Rapper Wiz Khalifa is the biggest new star of the past couple of years to wave the flag proudly, even naming his 2011 breakthrough album Rolling Papers. As he prepares follow-up O.N.I.F.C. for a fall release, we decided to take a look at the mainstreaming of pot in pop music, charting the 30 biggest hits on Billboard's Hot 100 about the good herb.

Surprisingly, some of music's most famous weed lovers have never dedicated a hit single to their drug of choice — not even Cheech & Chong (although pot definitely assisted the creation of "Earache My Eye" and the audience that made it a Top 20 hit). Toby Keith released a single called "Weed With Willie," but Willie Nelson himself mostly kept the stash in the tour bus. The Grateful Dead, who probably helped facilitate more parking lot dimebag transactions than any touring act ever, reserved the drug references in their hits ("Casey Jones," "Truckin'") for cocaine. Plus many musicians mention the ubiquitous leaf without celebrating it: Rob Base didn't smoke buddha, couldn't stand cess; and Merle Haggard asserted that "We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee."

No comprehensive list of weed songs would be complete without Peter Tosh's "Legalize It" or Black Sabbath's "Sweet Leaf," but neither cracked the Hot 100. And Cab Calloway's "Reefer Man" and Ella Fitzgerald's "Cow Cow Boogie" predate the chart entirely. But pot has had its sticky green fingers all over pop music since the '60s, and hip-hop has only brought it further into the spotlight (although this list is actually devoid of music from the "Just Say No" '80s). To keep our bong-hit parade shorter than 420 songs, we primarily included tunes where the THC content was especially high in the chorus or constituted the overall theme, filtering out the countless rap hits where weed just makes a 2 Chainz-style cameo. Sadly, that means neglecting memorable couplets like Lil Boosie's "Smoking on that purple / Famous like the Ninja Turtles," but at some point you have to separate the seeds from the stems. AL SHIPLEY

3. 30. Trick Daddy, feat. Cee-Lo and Big Boi - "Dro In Da Wind" (2002)

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Hot 100 Peak: 70
The title of the radio edit of T Double D's collaboration with two Dungeon Family associates was simply "In Da Wind," but it wasn't exactly hard for radio listeners to pick up the aroma that wafted off of Cee-Lo's hook. Daddy Fat Sax lays down some of hip-hop's most colorfully evocative lyrics about the smoking experience: "The 'dro and all the smoke, my throat, it makes me choke / Like a serial killer was squeezin' on my throat box / In the clutches of danger but not a stranger on the block / Is it the chiefery reefer beat blowin' my chest up?" We'll smoke to that.

4. 29. Joe Cocker - "With A Little Help From My Friends" (1968)

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Hot 100 Peak: 68
Although we all know that the Beatles got mad blunted (and it certainly came out in some of their more abstract psychedelic lyrics), the most overt reference to getting high in their catalog never exactly made a big impression on the pop charts. It was taken a bit farther a year after the original's release, though, when Joe Cocker sounded good and high on his classic over-the-top cover — hitting No. 68 in the U.S. and topping the U.K. charts.

5. 28. Rick James - "Mary Jane" (1978)

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Hot 100 Peak: 41
Cocaine is a helluva drug, but Mary Jane is the girl that helped Rick James kick off his career, thanks to the second single from his debut album, Come Get It. Many songwriters have used the same name to personify marijuana, but never so memorably as Rick.

6. 27. Ca$h Out - "Cashin' Out" (2012)

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Hot 100 Peak: 36
The list's most recent song — which hit No. 36 on the Hot 100 while climbing the upper echelons of the R&B charts a few months ago — features the heretofore unknown Atlanta rapper Ca$h Out extolling the virtues of smoking keisha while riding around with a similarly named pal.

7. 26. Purple Ribbon All-Stars - "Kryptonite (I'm On It)" (2005)

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Hot 100 Peak: 35
Big Boi makes his second appearance on the list with this hyperactive posse cut from his 2005 label compilation Got Purp? Vol. 2, managing to sneak weed euphemisms into both the song and album title. The track, featuring assists from Killer Mike, C-Bone, and Rock D, memorably got past the censors by referring to a different green substance that saps strength.

8. 25. Dr. Dre, feat. Snoop Dogg and Akon - "Kush" (2010)

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Hot 100 Peak: 34
If there was every any suspicion that Dr. Dre's long-delayed Detox was a disavowal of his most infamous album and substance, The Chronic, he put that thought to rest when he finally lit up the first single. A charming piece of medical marijuana from the good doctor, "Kush" peaked at No. 34 before Dre put the LP back in the vault (or perhaps the humidor) for a couple more years.

9. 24. Ray Charles - "Let's Go Get Stoned" (1966)

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Hot 100 Peak: 31
The Coasters released the original in 1965, but Ray recorded the definitive version of "Let's Go Get Stoned," which topped the R&B charts and hit No. 31 on the pop charts a year later. It's a pretty defiant move for a guy who'd just gotten out of rehab for his heroin addiction.

10. 23. Missy Elliott - "Pass That Dutch" (2002)

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Hot 100 Peak: 27
Although it wasn't (spoiler alert) as big as hit as the Musical Youth single that inspired it, the lead single from Missy Elliott's 2002 album This Is Not A Test sneaked into the Top 30. And while she made the title a little more radio-friendly by recasting the dutch as a dance craze spread via virus, it's telling that the symptoms she lists are "heavy breathing, wild dancing, coughing."

11. 22. D'Angelo - "Brown Sugar" (1995)

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Hot 100 Peak: 27
D'Angelo's debut single is usually thought to be, like the Rolling Stones hit of the same name, about getting down with a dark-skinned woman. But D's hit is actually a tricky double metaphor (or triple entendre?), in which the brown sugar that's actually a girl is really, actually, actually the spliff that turned his eyes blood burgundy. Talk about a slow burner!

12. 21. Dr. Dre, feat. Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, and Kurupt - "The Next Episode" (2000)

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Hot 100 Peak: 23
If "The Next Episode" ended at the 3:53 mark, after Nate Dogg's "Hey hey hey hey…" trails off, this song would probably not be on this list. Sure, throughout the track, Snoop and Dre and Kurupt drop references to lighting it up. But the reason the track will go down in history as one of rap's greatest pot anthems is the that final, booming four words that Nate Dogg intones before disappearing in a a cloud of puff: "SMOKE WEED EVERY DAY."

13. 20. Styles P - "Good Times (I Get High)" (2002)

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Hot 100 Peak: 22
The self-censorship that allows many of these songs to get on the radio reaches its hilarious extreme here, as producer Swizz Beatz doctors a sample of Freda Payne singing "I get high, high, high," adding just enough of a hint of the letter "B." Radio programmers were able to tell themselves that she's simply getting by convincingly enough that the song nearly broke the Top 20.

14. 19. Ludacris, feat. Sleepy Brown - "Saturday (Oooh! Ooooh!)" (2002)

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Hot 100 Peak: 22
Luda's second single from Word Of Mouf sounds exactly as deliriously goofy as a song about having a big weed stash on a Saturday should be, with Newcleus-biting helium chants of "sticky-icky-icky-icky" bookended by the titular cries of "Oooh! Ooooh!" In the verses, Chris Luva Luva's flair for offbeat turns of phrase has never been on better display — his homegrown is summed up with, "It's illegal 'bout the plants in my backyard grow," while he puffs smoke in your face and dares you to "act like I don't make cloud."

15. 18. John Mayer - "Who Says" (2009)

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Hot 100 Peak: 17
John Mayer's adult contemporary output rarely reflects the sordid life that we read about in interviews and tabloids. So it was a mild surprise when he defiantly asked, "Who says I can't get stoned?" in the opening line of the lead single from 2009's Battle Studies. Ever the bullshitter, though, Mayer said of the lyric, "When I sing it, I do not think about marijuana — I think about walking around your house naked with a guitar. It's about being in control of the pleasure in your life."

16. 17. Afroman - "Because I Got High" (2000)

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Hot 100 Peak: 13
"Because I Got High" is so stupidly simple that it's practically a nursery rhyme. It's also as funny as it is musically unpinnable, giving it the universal appeal of the ultimate novelty hit. It charted on the pop, rap, R&B, and alternative charts, despite not really sounding like any of the above.

17. 16. Three 6 Mafia, feat. Young Buck and 8Ball & MJG - "Stay High" (2005)

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Hot 100 Peak: 13
Just as Styles P turned "high" to "by" for the sake of radio play, Triple 6 scored their biggest hit by changing "high" to "fly" to soar up to No. 13. And nobody was really fooled, given that few crews in hip-hop history have strongly opposed sobriety more than the Hypnotize Camp Posse. DJ Paul, who is a dog you do not trust, gave you fair warning of what happens if you leave your green around him.

18. 15. Method Man and Redman - "How High" (1995)

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Hot 100 Peak: 13
Perhaps the ultimate smoking-up rap tune, "How High" was the first meeting on wax of two MCs who would become synonymous with weed — and with each other. "How High" sparked up a partnership that has spawned a film of the same name, a short-lived TV sitcom, and two joint albums…uh, that's two collaborative albums.

19. 14. Tom Petty - "You Don't Know How It Feels" (1994)

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Hot 100 Peak: 13
Tom Petty remained relevant on MTV and alternative-rock radio well into the mid-'90s, far longer than just about any of his contemporaries. And perhaps the reason a Traveling Wilbury was able to keep connecting with the kids was that he was willing to rile up censors, planting the line, "Let's roll another joint," right in the chorus of his last Top 40 hit.

20. 13. Busta Rhymes - "Turn It Up (Remix)/Fire It Up" (1997)

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Hot 100 Peak: 10
Many of these songs were explicitly about pot in their original album track incarnations, then bowdlerized to obscure the subject matter as commercial singles. Going against that tradition, Bussa Bus actually took a song that wasn't about weed — "Turn It Up" off 1997's When Disaster Strikes was was lyrically praising volume — and remixed it as "Fire It Up" so that it was about blowing loud.

21. 12. Musical Youth - "Pass the Dutchie" (1982)

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Hot 100 Peak: 10
After it was adapted from the Mighty Diamonds' "Pass the Koutchie," but before Missy Elliott's revival, the song most famously known as "Pass the Dutchie," reaching its greatest heights via this 1982 version from the Jamaican kiddie group Musical Youth. The track's producers changed the title from the overt pot reference "koutchie" to "dutchie," so that the children were ostensibly singing about crockery. But it kind of backfired, because the song ultimately helped popularize "dutch" as a euphemism for a joint.

22. 11. Brewer & Shipley - "One Toke Over The Line" (1970)

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Hot 100 Peak: 10
The folk-rock duo of Mike Brewer and Tom Shipley composed their only Top 40 hit as a joke backstage before a show. And in a surreal moment that cemented the song's legend, Vice President Spiro Agnew denounced it as "subversive" in early 1971, right around the same time Lawrence Welk introduced a performance of the song as a "modern spiritual."

23. 10. The Luniz - "I Got 5 On It" (1995)

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Hot 100 Peak: 8
The mid-'90s were truly the golden age of pot rap: Red met Meth, Snoop met the world, Cypress Hill were at their peak, and even a couple of weirdos like Yukmouth and Numskull could hit No. 8 on the pop charts celebrating a cheap baggie of weed.

24. 9. Snoop Doggy Dogg - "Gin and Juice" (1994)

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Hot 100 Peak: 8
Weed and alcohol are both celebrated in Calvin Broadus' most iconic solo hit. Though only the latter is mentioned in the song's title, you always got the sense that the drink was an incidental accessory to his one true love (which, as you'll note, is mentioned first in the chorus). As he continues to rack up possession arrests in airports, at The Tonight Show, on his tour bus, in Sweden, the world just shrugs: That's our Snoop.

25. 8. The Association - "Along Comes Mary" (1966)

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Hot 100 Peak: 7
The flowery language of Tandyn Almer's lyric for "Along Comes Mary" makes it one of the more extravagantly coded drug songs of the '60s, though potheads all seemed to recognize that girl who gave them "kicks," but also "let them see reality." And then in the '90s, dedicated enemies of subtlety the Bloodhound Gang covered the song for the Half Baked soundtrack, just to stomp out any remaining ambiguity.

26. 7. Snoop Dogg & Wiz Khalifa, feat. Bruno Mars - "Young, Wild & Free" (2011)

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Hot 100 Peak: 7
Snoop Dogg has passed a lot of torches in his day, both literal and figurative. And every time a new rapper becomes as closely associated with weed as he is, Snoop seems eager to give them his co-sign. In Wiz's case, the two skinny smokers got along so well that they made a direct-to-DVD stoner comedy together, and bumrushed the Top Ten with the lead single from the soundtrack.

27. 6. Sean Paul - "Gimme the Light" (2002)

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Hot 100 Peak: 7
Despite the title making it plainly obvious, Jamaican dancehall star Sean Paul's breakthrough U.S. hit still put on airs of being about something besides toking up: "Pass the dro" becomes "start the show," and the light at the end of his joint becomes a spotlight. All the world's a stage.

28. 5. Sean Paul - "We Be Burnin'" (2005)

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Hot 100 Peak: 6
Since he'd sneaked a transparent weed anthem into the Top 10 once already, Sean Paul decided to go even higher with the lead single from 2005's The Trinity. In Jamaica, "We Be Burnin' (Legalize It)" had a pointed message, while the more vague "We Be Burnin' (Recognize It)" went platinum in the U.S.

29. 4. Kid Cudi - "Day N Nite" (2009)

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Hot 100 Peak: 3
Recently, Cudi has informed the press that he's been sober for several months, while also stating that he's been suffering writer's block for several months. One has to wonder if he's not paying for turning his back on the inspiration behind his greatest success. In contrast to the happy-go-lucky pot raps that usually hit the charts, Cudi managed to top them all by getting paranoid and introspective, casting himself as "the lonely stoner" (or, as the radio edit hilariously has it, "the lonely loner").

30. 3. Peter, Paul and Mary - "Puff the Magic Dragon" (1963)

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Hot 100 Peak: 2
For decades, the members of Peter, Paul and Mary have sworn up and down that the urban legends about their sweet little folk song were simply not true. And y'know, maybe they're not, but sometimes rumors come to dominate a song's place in popular consciousness so much that you just have to print the legend. Also, come on.

31. 2. Bob Dylan - "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" (1966)

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Hot 100 Peak: 2
Although Dylan, as always, played fast and loose with language enough to blur the different meanings of "stoned" throughout the song, he didn't seem to mind one bit when many radio stations banned it as a "drug song," which didn't stop the lead cut from Blonde on Blonde from hitting No. 2. Legend has it, Bobby Zimmerman's giggling demeanor on the record is a direct result of the joints being passed around during the session.

32. 1. The Steve Miller Band - "The Joker" (1974)

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Hot 100 Peak: 1
That no-playing motherfucker Steve Miller wrote not just the biggest pop hit about smoking and toking but the one that simply sounds the most stoned. Free-associating references to his own songs ("Space Cowboy," "Gangster of Love," and "Enter Maurice"), as well as the oft-misunderstood phrase "pompatus of love," Miller and his wandering wah-wah guitar lines created one of the wooziest, druggiest sounds you can still hearing wafting out of classic-rock radio stations and dentists' offices every hour of every day.