Billed as "New York City's Music Festival," this past weekend's inaugural Catalpa Festival reflected the Big Apple's diversity. SPIN braved the torrential downpours to bring you this report.

1.Gin and Juice and Mud

1/11

Billed as "New York City's Music Festival," this past weekend's inaugural Catalpa Festival reflected the Big Apple's diversity. The two-day billing represented a wild variety of genres: garage rockers the Black Keys, emerging rap star A$AP Rocky, indie rockers TV on the Radio, jam rockers Umphrey's McGee, house music lifer Felix Da Housecat and even a dedicated High Times-sponsored reggae stage (which had no carved-in-stone set times, much to our dismay and the artists' delight). Taking place on Randall's Island, a somewhat difficult-to-access patch of earth protruding from between Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens, the fest certainly had its share of lows and, with Snoop headlining, highs. Despite some killer performances, the biggest disappointment was the less-than-sold-out turnout — possibly due to the $100-per-day ticket prices, torrential downpours, the legendary apathy of NYC audiences, the ultra-diversity of the lineup, or just a glut of area festivals. Still, for those who made the trek, there were some amazing moments. KORY GROW

2.Gin and Juice and Mud

2/11

Billed as "New York City's Music Festival," this past weekend's inaugural Catalpa Festival reflected the Big Apple's diversity. The two-day billing represented a wild variety of genres: garage rockers the Black Keys, emerging rap star A$AP Rocky, indie rockers TV on the Radio, jam rockers Umphrey's McGee, house music lifer Felix Da Housecat and even a dedicated High Times-sponsored reggae stage (which had no carved-in-stone set times, much to our dismay and the artists' delight). Taking place on Randall's Island, a somewhat difficult-to-access patch of earth protruding from between Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens, the fest certainly had its share of lows and, with Snoop headlining, highs. Despite some killer performances, the biggest disappointment was the less-than-sold-out turnout — possibly due to the $100-per-day ticket prices, torrential downpours, the legendary apathy of NYC audiences, the ultra-diversity of the lineup, or just a glut of area festivals. Still, for those who made the trek, there were some amazing moments. KORY GROW

3.Most Worthy Of Na-Na-Na's: The Black Keys

3/11

As soon as the garage-rock duo (plus a couple of friends) hit the stage and launched into Led Zep-influenced guitar rockers like "Howlin' for You," the biggest audience of Saturday (meaning it stretched past the sound booth) chanted "na-na-na" to a sizable percentage of vocalist-guitarist Dan Auerbach's single-note-riff ragers. It established the sort of party atmosphere the Catalpa organizers were hoping for all along. In a little less than 90 minutes, Auerbach, drummer Patrick Carney, and their pals rattled off a series of hits and fan favorites like "Thickfreakness," "Girl Is on My Mind," "Your Touch" and, of course, "I Got Mine." Black Keys T-shirts at Catalpa were as ubiquitous as Slayer T's at every other concert. Auerbach kept his trademark cool, rarely addressing the audience, save for a few perfunctory "thank yous" and "let's keep this movings," reserving his energy for full-body spasms during his solos. "Dead and Gone," off the pair's latest, El Camino, got the most na-na-na's — because, well, Auerbach sings 'em on disc — but it really captured the feel-good nature of the Black Keys' music. It made it easier to forget just how wet and wrinkly our feet were.

4.Most "New York, I Love You And You're Not Letting Me Down" Moment: TV on the Radio

4/11

Cries of "Brooklyn!" came from the audience when indie rockers TV on the Radio hit the stage Saturday night, making for one of the day's only reminders that this is indeed New York's festival. As they kicked into the never-endingly awesome 2003 slow burner "Young Liars," frontman Tunde Adebimpe smiled and waved at a few familiar faces up front, and guitarist-vocalist Kyp Malone seemed to mug repeatedly at one fan. It was a homecoming of sorts for the band who last played New York last September. Strangely, it was one of the day's shortest sets. They started about 10 minutes late and ended 10 minutes early. Nevertheless, they squeezed in "Staring at the Sun," "Wolf Like Me" and "Will Do," a song that prompted the first main stage appearance glow sticks. The most NYC-affirming moment, though, came just before "Second Song," a cut from the group's latest, Nine Types of Light. "This next song is dedicated to a dear-departed inspiration, Mr. Adam Yauch," said the Pittsburgh-bred Adebimpe when introducing it. "I would not be in New York City without the words of that man."

5.Most Egregious Set-List Omission: Snoop Dogg

5/11

Snoop Dogg seemed to miss one song from his recitation of the classic 1993 album Doggystyle at his Sunday-night headlining spot: the Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick cover "Lodi Dodi." Over the course of the evening, Snoop managed to command every other song from his 53-minute gangsta-rap masterpiece, including the "lost" track "Gz Up, Hoes Down," but maybe because he did some of the songs out of order or maybe because he replaced it with a set of songs he did with Dr. Dre, but Mr. Dogg did not once proclaim he likes to party. That said, he also bothered nobody. The set was a smash, and the biggest audience of the weekend sang along with every song, shouted at Nasty Dogg (Snoop's dog-suited mascot who walks around with a giant spliff and an even bigger phallus) and created a cloud of weed smoke that rivaled the weekend's storm clouds. An appearance by the Lady of Rage and Snoop's original Dogg Pound made the night special. When the album was done, and the encore had begun, Snoop kept energy high by doing "Drop It Like It's Hot" and singing "Young, Wild & Free," stepping into the background as his DJ played Wiz Khalifa's verses.

6.Most Waterproof Band: Zola Jesus

6/11

Right when gothic-tinged synth-pop artist Nika Danilova — who performs as Zola Jesus — hit the stage for her 4:15 set on Saturday, the sky replicated the downpour heard at the beginning of the first Black Sabbath LP. And it didn't stop. Not that it deterred Danilova, who was wearing a white space-age-looking dress to set her apart from her bandmates' black garb. Instead she climbed the lighting truss that supported the main stage's sign that read "Dance Bitches!"; she went to the front of the stage where she allowed the rain to drench her bleached-blonde hair; and she eventually broke the fourth wall (fourth waterfall?) and joined the audience in the mud. While some of the audience ran for cover of the vodka bar, others stuck around to grab the towels Danilova threw at the crowd. Never did her strong alto waver, and her band never backed down from playing fierce, dark sounds. "You guys must really like music," Danilova said.

7.Weirdest Stage Banter: The Demos

7/11

From "This is a song about fucking," for a funky indie rock number to "We have cool new shirts… they have clouds on them," the Demos' gnarly idea of rapport actually did a disservice to their set, which had people dancing. It all culminated with their biggest "huh?!" moment, when frontman Jason Milton announced, "This next song is a cover by what I consider to be the greatest living poet." The song was "Dance With Me," the poet was erstwhile Moldy Peach Adam Green, and said poetry consisted of lines like, "Feel my love, coming from the heavens above." Screw you, Maya Angelou!

8.Best Reason to Forget the Mud: The Big Pink

8/11

The shoegazers might not have gotten all of its 150 or so onlookers to stare at their mud-caked kicks, but they certainly got people thinking about where they put their feet when a handful danced to the British trio's sampler-driven squall. Thanks to a beaming 2 p.m. sun, the ground had mostly hardened up, save a few puddles of mud. Luckily, the Big Pink's brand of fuzz is upbeat enough that nobody seemed to mind. Frontman Robbie Furze kept morale high throughout the set, as he clanged sporadically on his Tele, and keyboardist Milo Cordell filled the gaps with dubby noise.

9.Awesomest Stage Banter: Matt and Kim

9/11

"I know what you're thinking, we're a little out of shape," said M&K drummer-grandstander Kim Schifino early the duo's Sunday Catalpa set. "I've been doing exercises, though — something called a Kegel…because I want to fuck the shit out of you tonight!" Earlier in their set, vocalist-keyboardist Matt Johnson explained that the group had taken six months off from performing to work on new album, Lightning, and that this was their first concert of 2012. When they gave the song "Let's Go" a live debut, Johnson introed by saying, "Don't judge our new record on how bad this song will be." After a snafu where Schifino hit Johnson's keyboard, disabling it during the final song, "Daylight" ("I get crazy with the sticks and I just have to hit shit"), they left the stage, thanking the crowd for "taking our 2012 virginity."

10.Swaggest Rapper: A$AP Rocky

10/11

Although one member of 23-year-old Harlem rapper A$AP Rocky's crew was wearing a "Fuck Swag" T-shirt, no human at Catalpa used the word "swag" more than the MC. In fact, no artist reveled in purple lights like Rocky, nobody ended their songs with as many dubby horns, and absolutely no one had the bevy of gun sound effects for every turn of the set that Rocky's DJ had on file. Because of all these bullets and whistles, Rocky's set fell a little flat — if not for that fact that during most of the songs, which included "Wassup" and, naturally, "Purple Swag," the rapper simply shouted along with his own backing tracks, overpowering the PA. Perhaps the most interesting part of the set, though, was during a break when Rocky talked about how people used to "fuck with us" for wearing skinny jeans around 2004. "Now we're right here with our skinny jeans and you embrace that shit," he said, pleased. Swag!

11.Best Backing Crew: Girl Talk

11/11

As mash-up party monster Girl Talk created musical collisions that got the crowd cheering (Ice Cube's "It Was a Good Day" vs. M.I.A.'s "Paper Planes," for example) and a few that made the audience recoil a little (seguing from Nirvana into Belinda Carlisle), he had a support staff that stood by him — literally — throughout his hour-plus set. The 20-some-odd people surrounding Gillis' lights and DJ equipment, jumped, hollered, let off balloons and fired a toilet-paper gun all over the audience, expending at least an economy pack of TP. When he crushed together Nine Inch Nails' "Wish" with Kelly Clarkson's "Since U Been Gone," they let out balloons stuffed with confetti, and when he closed the set with his take on "November Rain," the onstage onlookers reveled as even more confetti rained down on them and the audience.