Beach House, Nicki Minaj, RHCP, and more: Summer is ready when you are.

1.Summer Is Ready When You Are

1/27

The steamiest season fires a variety of musical desires and needs. Artists wanna soak up the roar of a crowd (especially at oversize outdoor festivals where they can still feel like rock-star giants) and refine their performances of material both old and new; plus, lacking record sales and label support, there’s another, perhaps more urgent imperative — keeping the enterprise afloat, often en masse (via mega- and mini-festivals, multiple bills, reunion tours). Fans, full of wet hot anticipation and facing bone-dry economic reality, have to pick their spots to cut loose and enjoy the bounty. So, instead of simply rounding up the usual, big-name suspects, we've decided to be slightly more selective this year, and try to make "best" mean "this could be awesome" and not just "this is inevitable."

So, you won't find justifications here for the Beach Boys' ghoulish, never-ending surf-slog (though their new album, That's Why God Made the Radio ain't godawful at all), or Roger Waters' insistence on banging our heads against The Wall until we just give him our wallets, or the ongoing Springsteen-athon, or Billy Corgan's latest, unnecessarily combative reboot of Smashing Pumpkins, or Aerosmith's cash-in on Steven Tyler's American Idol buffoonery, or Van Halen's well-it's-better-than-anyone-could've-predicted victory lap, or Coldplay's endless, inoffensive odyssey, or Linkin Park's smoothly humming model of angsty corporate efficiency, or Dave Matthews and Phish's eternal reminder that, like the Grateful Dead, they won't stop until everybody ends up comatose on a hammock in some Yasgur's Acres Retirement Community.

So, we're taking some liberties, and suggesting stuff that feels a tad fresher, or at least doesn’t reek of BENGAY and alimony payments. The party starts here (and ends whenever Labor Day smacks us senseless). Enjoy!

2.Summer Is Ready When You Are

2/27

The steamiest season fires a variety of musical desires and needs. Artists wanna soak up the roar of a crowd (especially at oversize outdoor festivals where they can still feel like rock-star giants) and refine their performances of material both old and new; plus, lacking record sales and label support, there’s another, perhaps more urgent imperative — keeping the enterprise afloat, often en masse (via mega- and mini-festivals, multiple bills, reunion tours). Fans, full of wet hot anticipation and facing bone-dry economic reality, have to pick their spots to cut loose and enjoy the bounty. So, instead of simply rounding up the usual, big-name suspects, we've decided to be slightly more selective this year, and try to make "best" mean "this could be awesome" and not just "this is inevitable."

So, you won't find justifications here for the Beach Boys' ghoulish, never-ending surf-slog (though their new album, That's Why God Made the Radio ain't godawful at all), or Roger Waters' insistence on banging our heads against The Wall until we just give him our wallets, or the ongoing Springsteen-athon, or Billy Corgan's latest, unnecessarily combative reboot of Smashing Pumpkins, or Aerosmith's cash-in on Steven Tyler's American Idol buffoonery, or Van Halen's well-it's-better-than-anyone-could've-predicted victory lap, or Coldplay's endless, inoffensive odyssey, or Linkin Park's smoothly humming model of angsty corporate efficiency, or Dave Matthews and Phish's eternal reminder that, like the Grateful Dead, they won't stop until everybody ends up comatose on a hammock in some Yasgur's Acres Retirement Community.

So, we're taking some liberties, and suggesting stuff that feels a tad fresher, or at least doesn’t reek of BENGAY and alimony payments. The party starts here (and ends whenever Labor Day smacks us senseless). Enjoy!

3.Nicki Minaj

3/27

Dates: June 8-August 12
Price: $50-$85
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: Lady Ms. Onika hoped to rev up her first solo tour (after opening gigs with Lil Wayne and Britney) with a headline slot at the much-mythologized Hot 97 Summer Jam this past Sunday. But Peter Rosenberg, a blowhard DJ for the New York-based radio station, openly insulted Minaj while hosting the second-stage show in the parking lot of MetLife Stadium, implying that her single "Starships" wasn't "real hip-hop" and that the women who liked it weren't worthy of his time. But only hours later, at the behest of Young Money label mentor Lil Wayne, Minaj told Hot 97 to eat a bowl of dillz and canceled her show; the next day, she went on Hot 97 and ethered out another blowhard DJ, Funkmaster Flex, who incoherently played station company man. Hey, we wish Minaj would rap more and sing less too, and kinda think her awkwardly transgressive, Lisa Frank-graffiti stage design, and insanely bewigged lip-synching are a shade unnerving, but hey, how is all this not way more fascinating than anything we've come to expect from 99 percent of our pop stars! How about we just enjoy the spectacle and let the nonpareil dynamo live?
See Complete Schedule: On her website.

4.The Hives

4/27

Dates: June 19-30
Price: $25-$35
Opening Acts: FIDLAR
Why You Should Go: While Lex Hives, the Swedes' current album, is a markedly more consistent batch of garage-punk idiot-walkin' than 2007's The Black and White Album, such distinctions are trivial when compared to the band's masterfully whip-saw live performances. And the Hives' flamboyant frontman Howlin' Pelle Almqvist dismisses all such judgments, regardless. When SPIN recently asked why Hives' shows are better than Hives albums, he shot back: "It's just that other bands suck so much live that people only talk about our shows. Anyway, comparing [our] concerts [our] to albums is like asking if The Godfather is better than the "Mona Lisa." Catch more of Almqvist's unmatched stage banter now, because from July through December, he'll be off insulting Europe.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

5.Drake

5/27

Dates: Now through July 7
Price: $50-$205
Opening Acts: Waka Flocka Flame, 2 Chainz, J. Cole
Why You Should Go: Drake has undeniable hits like we have trust issues and an inability to meet deadlines (in fact, there's one of Drake's hits now booming out of a passing SUV as we blow another deadline!), so, yeah, you'll know every single song, and if dude can just not fall on his cardigan bespoke butt and keep the embattled patter to a minimum, this should be one long this-is-my-shit coronation. But perhaps the best thing you can say about Sir Aubrey is that his irrational confidence allows him to line up the most intimidating roster of opening-act talent of any summer tour going, hip-hop or otherwise. Our current cover star Waka, of course, could headline on his own, and consumes the scenery like a High Def 3-D dungeon-dragon, while 2 Chainz might be the second-most fascinating id-on-the-loose (after Waka) currently stalking the pop countryside in search of appropriate prey. Good ol' voted-most-likely-to-make-us-feel-better-about-ourselves-somehow, next-big-somethingorother rap guy J. Cole is actually a beast live, selling his songs with raw passion when the hooks don't quite measure up.
See Complete Schedule: On his website.

6.Metric

6/27

Dates: Now through October
Price: $28-$53
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: With the release of their fifth album Synthetica (in our humble opinion, the pinnacle of their recorded output), and nearly 15 years of alt-pop excellence, this should be the Toronto-born synth-rockers' year to shine in a much more luminous spotlight, headlining venues on the order of Radio City Music Hall. Frontwoman Emily Haines appeared as the '90s women-in-rock narrative was being bullied offstage by the rap-metal ass party that none of us did enough to stop at the time, but she's never flinched for a minute, and now can be seen as the logical heir to Shirley Manson as alt-pop empress — just as steely-eyed but more open to the possibility of happiness when it's not raining. Metric's new single, "Youth Without Youth," may be the best song on the new Garbage album, which is no insult to the Garbage album.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

7.The Black Keys

7/27

Dates: Now through August 4
Price: $33-$75
Opening Acts: Not yet announced; primarily festival lineups
Why You Should Go: The Black Keys are officially the most badass nerds to ever command an arena or main stage (seriously: just look at these photos). They are peerless as a less-is-way-more, garage-rawk/blooz-punk juggernaut, but by now there's no point in doing verbal backflips trying to classify what they're up to. What the Black Keys — still only two guys, but assisted live by a bassist and keyboardist — do is virtually unprecedented in 2012: They play no-frills, blues-based classic rock that doesn't sound old or gray or ponytailed or young or tie-dyed or ponytailed, and they keep getting tighter and louder and more, uh, swaggery, and that's that, kiddo.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

8.Florence + the Machine

8/27

Dates: July 20 through October
Price: $31-$138
Opening Acts: The Walkmen, the Maccabees
Why You Should Go: Due to her earthy emotion, flowing garments, radiant mane, expansive pipes, and pounding pianos, Florence Welch has become her generation's Kate Bush (or Tori Amos), but she's more approachable than either, and her live performances are tour-de-force wailathons that steer clear of fairy-tale fog or therapy-session oversharing. A likable fury, she's "so much better than her material that her material is rendered immaterial," as Rob Harvilla put it in his SPIN review of her 2011 album Ceremonials. The Walkmen's button-down boy-rock majesty should provide a quaintly appropriate counterpoint. And after their near-epic brooding, Welch will blow through the venue like Hurricane Flo.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

9.Ceremony

9/27

Dates: Now through July 9
Price: $10-$14
Opening Acts: Screaming Females
Why You Should Go: The current conventional summer wisdom is to go enormo or go home — whether it's a multi-day festival or a stacked bill at an arena or stadium. But this tour is about developing an intimate relationship between performer and audience in a relatively modest space, or to put it more plainly, the performer wailing directly into the audience's beseeching fucking face (photo evidence here). Bay Area hardcores Ceremony are a relentless, sneakily melodic wrecking ball, from which snarling frontman Ross Farrar repeatedly launches himself amid a sweat sprinkler; recent album Zoo expanded the band's anthemic roar with nuanced riffs and mindful songwriting, which gives their live chaos a deeper foundation. Add New Jersey punk iconoclasts Screaming Females — led by the meticulously brawny shreditude of Marissa Paternoster — and this may be the season's most gloriously head-ringing evening of rock.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

10.Red Hot Chili Peppers

10/27

Dates: June, August 3-15, late September through November
Price: $38.50-$58.50
Opening Acts: Little Dragon, Santigold, Janelle Monáe
Why You Should Go: Let's be honest, the Chili Peppers without John Frusciante on guitar are a far less expressive, much more predictable, though still heavily scarred animal — replacement Josh Klinghoffer is nobody's hack (having played with PJ Harvey, Beck, Warpaint, and others), but he possesses a session pro's dependability and Frusciante's gift was his ability to provide a sleazy-soulful, grotty-Hollywood backdrop for Anthony Kiedis' jivey diary entries. That also meant a lot of meandering bullshit. This sober and efficient version of the Peppers relies on the strength of their catalog, built over almost 30 years, rather than alchemy. Plus, when you're holding up your cell phones and singing along to "Under the Bridge," you'll know exactly what Kiedis is singing about. After going abroad until early August, the band will return for Lollapalooza and a short two-week run, then dig in for a longer stretch in the fall. After being swinging dicks for so many years, these dudes are now elder statesmanly, and their excellent taste in opening acts reflects a less brocephusly funky outlook.
See Complete Schedule: On their website. See the bridge Anthony Kiedis was "Under" here.

11.Beach House

11/27

Dates: July 1-23
Price: $25-$32
Opening Acts: Wild Nothing
Why You Should Go: Listening to Beach House's fourth album Bloom, a hypnotic collection of luxuriously textured, dreamily methodical exhalations, one might be tempted to assume that the duo's appearances in the flesh were unnecessary, or just potentially snoozy, flawed versions of the record. Instead, singer-keyboardist Victoria Legrand becomes an even more looming presence onstage, recalling any number of husky-voiced leading ladies from decades past (Marianne Faithfull, Stevie Nicks, Hope Sandoval), as guitarist Alex Scally sits perched on a chair to her right, providing haunting, elemental accompaniment. The yearning rasp of the band's first single "Myth" gets particularly heart-pounding live.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

12.Santigold

12/27

Dates: Now until September 2
Price: $30-$48
Opening Acts: Charli XCX, Theophilus London, Shawn Woolfolk
Why You Should Go: Ever since she became a focus of bloggy fascination in 2007, Santi White has been working assiduously to create a live experience that does spectacular justice to her polyglot-pop fantasias. And now, five years later, with the release of her most fully realized album, Master of My Make-Believe, and this tour, she's finally done just that. Of course, there's her taut, versatile backing band and impossibly rad interpretive-dance duo, who have somehow recombined and updated and improved upon Big Daddy Kane's Scoob and Scrap Lover, Public Enemy's S1Ws, and every dazzling Double Dutch crew of teenaged girls who never got a formal stage to rock. But mostly it's all Santi, whose serenely confident and sheerly joyful demeanor is what summer should always feel like. Read our latest Santi interview here.
See Complete Schedule: On her website.

13.Porter Robinson

13/27

Dates: June 10-August 19
Price: $16-$90
Opening Acts: The M Machine, Mat Zo, Lazy Rich, Dabura, YOS
Why You Should Go: Virtually a touring vet at age 19, North Carolina wunderkind and Skrillex signee Porter Robinson has wowed not-especially-curious throngs when he's opened for superstar DJs like Tiësto. And now he's bringing his lithe yet thunderous big-room bangers, which (much like Skrillex) splash together the most colorfully affecting swaths of progressive/electro house and dubstep — most notably via his signature booming tunes "Say My Name" and "Spitfire" — out on the road for his first headlining solo tour. Then, on July 28, he'll join up with Identity Festival, the EDM traveling circus also featuring Nero, Eric Prydz, Paul Van Dyk, Wolfgang Gartner, and Excision.
See Complete Schedule: On his website.

14.Fiona Apple

14/27

Dates: June 19-July 29
Price: $39-$90
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: Seven years after releasing her last album, the beloved, torment-purging songstress returns to share another batch of raw, gritty songs, which she tells SPIN she doesn't even remember writing. Regardless, the pint-sized powerhouse's 2012 shows haven't disappointed, with her playful onstage eccentricities giving the crowd a brief glimpse of light amid the depths of her dark musings and guttural wail. At a March date in Brooklyn, she showed the crowd a painting of her dog Janet, who she said she missed, before vowing, "I will give you everything I can possibly give you." Can't ask for more than that, but maybe leave the pooch out of it?
See Complete Schedule: On her website.

15.Sleigh Bells

15/27

Dates: Now through July 22
Price: $22-$42
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: Look, we already put these Brooklyn kids on the cover of our magazine and raved at length about their latest album Reign of Terror, and their thrilling single (and dreamily haunting video) "Comeback Kid," blahblahblah. It's basically the coolest operation out there, and Alexis Krauss is the most compelling pop performer this side of Nicki Minaj and Santigold and the most purely pleasurable rock frontperson this side of nobody. She's. The. Shit. And their live shows are quick, sure-shot blasts, meticulously arranged and stage-managed by mastermind guitarist Derek Miller (who's assisted live by second guitarist Jason Boyer), so if you're the easily distracted type, you're never tempted to look away for a millisecond. Simply, Sleigh Bells slay.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

16.Flux Pavilion

16/27

Dates: Now through June 17
Price: $25-35
Opening Acts: Cookie Monsta, Brown & Gammon, Dodge & Fuski, Skism
Why You Should Go: From precision gut punch ("Bass Cannon") to brazen strut ("Superbad") to hands-aloft anthemic gush ("Daydreamer"), 23-year-old blond don Joshua Steele, a.k.a. Flux Pavilion, is doing more than any current dubstep producer to elevate the music to massive status without cheesing out shamelessly. For his first full-on U.S. jaunt, he's following the trail blazed by Bassnectar, doggedly attempting to visit every region of the country, from Syracuse to Tulsa to St. Louis to Richmond, before heading back home to the U.K. with fellow bass fiend Dillon Francis.
See Complete Schedule: On his Facebook.

17.Japandroids

17/27

Dates: June 11-August 19
Price: $13.50-$18.75
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: Two completely unremarkable-looking Canadian dudes hovering around 30 years old and kinda freaking the fuck out about it, singer-guitarist Brian King and drummer-singer David Prowse write memorable anthems of anxious desperation which sound like about 20 other more famous, anxiously desperate bands and have titles with not-quite-epic puns that might help get you through the night if you cranked 'em loud enough — but maybe not. Their latest album, Celebration Rock is the sound of one, tiny, pale, well-meaning fist pumping, and live, when they can convince at least a reasonable quorum of other tiny, well-meaning fists to pump along with them, Japandroids are indeed a celebratory sight.
See Complete Schedule: On their label's website.

18.Wiz Khalifa

18/27

Dates: July 25-September 3
Price: $30-$90
Opening Acts: Mac Miller, Kendrick Lamar, Chiddy Bang, Schoolboy Q, Chevy Woods
Why You Should Go: Aside from the Odd Couple pairing of Drake and Waka Flocka Flame, Wiz Khalifa's stonerly titled "Under the Influence of Music" tour is the most motley assemblage of high-profile hip-hop talent on the circuit this summer. A wiry, wired weedhead who gets by on a will-rap-for-seeds bonhomie, Khalifa should be expected to barrage the crowd with a medley of his crossover hits (please, no "Payphone"!); Black Hippy's Kendrick Lamar and Schoolboy Q should transfix the whiteboy-wasted faithful by simply being able to rap a zillion times better than everyone else on the bill; and though Chiddy Bang are still coasting on their indie-sampling buzz of a few years back, the Philly duo are an enthusiastic live presence. And presenting Mac Miller as Joey Bishop.
See Complete Schedule:: On his website.

19.Wilco

19/27

Dates: Now through August 4
Price: $25-$65
Opening Acts: Blitzen Trapper, Lee Ranaldo, Kelly Hogan, Andrew Bird, Avett Brothers, Punch Brothers, Dr. Dog, Megafaun, Lee Fields
Why You Should Go: With 2011's The Whole Love, Wilco's late-era lineup (spotlighting drummer Glenn Kotche and guitarist Nels Cline) hit a stunning stride, recording perhaps the group's most tautly exhilarating album in its 18-year run. And live, they seemed locked in like never before, with frontman Jeff Tweedy especially geeked by Cline's experimental finesse. The wide variety of terrific openers at different tour stops is a testament to Wilco's energetic fandom, and the possibility of Sonic Youth's Lee Ranaldo (who has previously played and recorded with Cline), joining Wilco onstage during his short run, is enough to inspire road trips.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

20.Scissor Sisters

20/27

Dates: June 15-July 7
Price: $30-$45
Opening Acts: Rye Rye
Why You Should Go: After shelving their third album, and recording an entirely new one (2010's Night Work) that never caught fire, Scissor Sisters unjustly drifted out of the pop consciousnesss, despite opening some dates on Lady Gaga's Monster Ball tour. But with their latest, Magic Hour, the New York-based dance-pop showboats, led by the still-giddy cabaret escapades of singers Jake Shears and Ana Matronic, come preening back, adding a clutch of ace tracks to their underrated catalog (exultantly clear-eyed singles "Baby Come Home" and "Only the Horses," both co-produced by Boys Noize, plus the artfully bittersweet pop of "Inevitable" and "San Luis Obispo"). Count on Baltimore pop-rap dervish Rye Rye to provide an extra-sassy zap of energy.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

21.Eric Church

21/27

Dates: Now through December 15
Price: $30-$60
Opening Acts: Robert Earl Keen, Aaron Lewis, Lee Brice, Thomas Rhett, Jake Owen, Justin Moore, Kip Moore (opener changes throughout tour)
Why You Should Go: You could hump it over to Bruce Springsteen's Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Hootenanny, but you'll have a livelier time at this gifted Nashville loudmouth's ongoing "Blood, Sweat & Beers" tour (in support of Chief, SPIN's No. 1 country album of 2011). Church offers that rarest of combos — impeccable songwriting and musicianship, plus genuine ornery attitude, and his anthemic, Boss-inspired can of corn, "Springsteen," is the finest addition to the doomed exurban-bandana-romance catalog since Steve Earle's I Feel Alright rebirth.
See Complete Schedule: On his website.

22.Flaming Lips

22/27

Dates: June 8-August 26
Price: Primarily festivals, ticket prices vary
Opening Acts: See festival lineups
Why You Should Go: After almost 30 years of tripped-out antics and sublimely psyched-out soul searching, no other current rock band rewards you for still giving a shit like the Flaming Lips. The confetti cannon, giant hamster orb, bear costumes, six-hour songs, consistently compelling albums, etc., would be enough for most, but indefatigable master of ceremonies Wayne Coyne has been steadily workin' his 2012 hustle: Recording songs with Ke$ha and Erykah Badu (for the former, he witnessed the teen-pop miscreant order her assistant to procure acid, or so Coyne told Marc Maron on his WTF podcast; as for the latter, he hugely offended Badu with an unauthorized-by-her NSFW video, plus some kinda-dodgy naked tweets — never a dull moment!). The Lips also will try to beat Jay-Z's Guinness Book record for most concerts in 24 hours, playing multiple cities throughout the South on June 27 and streaming the shows live.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

23.Spoek Mathambo

23/27

Dates: July 12-27
Price: $10-$20
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: This past March at SPIN's SXSW showcase, South African township-tech whirlwind Spoek Mathambo held down the fairly thankless, abbreviated early-afternoon slot and somehow, even effortlessly (though he convulsed all over the stage), had the dusty crowd smiling, dancing, and air-keytaring in amazement. His 2012 album, Father Creeper (released in March), is a politically knotty, plainly heart-wrenched, rhythmically giddy, Afro-futurist rattling of alt-rock bones, with guitars amped up to grind against the dance beats he previously pushed to the fore. And live, on his first U.S. tour, the singer/rapper/raconteur will likely take care to properly fuck up your head (redemptively, of course).
See Complete Schedule: On his website.

24.My Morning Jacket

24/27

Dates: July 14 through September
Price: $20-$64
Opening Acts: Band of Horses, Trombone Shorty, Shabazz Palaces, Iron & Wine
Why You Should Go: Rescuing "classic rock" from boomer-flogging purgatory, My Morning Jacket honor the past while ascending well into the future, giving full voice and sprawl and eccentric kick to their Americana meditations, ending up flailing somewhere between Big Star and Skynyrd, but with a shaggy, soul-infused sound that's all their own. Expect to reach a point about an hour and a half in when you'll fade a bit, and then Jim James and crew will ignite some unexpected, just-this-side-of-jammy fireworks that'll hit you like a chocolate-Thai cloudburst. Band of Horses share MMJ's devotion to facial hair and reverbed transcendence, and may debut some material from their fourth album, slated for release later this year. Showstopping New Orleans jazz-hop phenom Trombone Shorty, art-rap etherealists Shabazz Palaces, and folkie maximalists Iron & Wine join up for select dates. In addition, starting with their current European tour dates, the band will begin a "Spontaneous Curation Series," with fans helping to decide each night's set list via Twitter.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

25.Future

25/27

Dates: Now through July 14
Price: $30-$90
Opening Acts: Pusha T
Why You Should Go: With his SPIN Essential album Pluto, Future went from the strangely droning, second-hand Auto-Tune ATLien with that annoying "Tony Montana" single to a strangely droning, gleefully alien (in his own definitive way), stunningly liberating presence, perhaps the most innovatively baffling new rapper on the scene since Lil Wayne. As Brandon Soderberg put it in our review: "Pluto might be the first album in rap history where the ballads are stronger than the bangers. Then again, most of the ballads tend to bang as hard as the bangers, proving that a devastating low-end can convey passion and pain as effectively as it signifies menace." Who knows how all this will go live, but considering Future's gift for artistic surprises, we wanna be there. Plus, Pusha T is one of the most technically sophisticated MCs of all time, even if his career anxiety has caused him to become a grasping grump (beefing with Weezy) and discomfiting uncle (glomming onto Odd Future). Still, all the more likely that something tweet-worthy will be spit onstage. (Read our most recent Future Q&A.)
See Complete Schedule: On his website.

26.Corrosion of Conformity

26/27

Dates: Now through June 25
Price: $15-$20
Opening Acts: Torche, Black Cobra, Gaza
Why You Should Go: In the '80s, Raleigh, North Carolina's C.O.C. were never crowned as hardcore-punk icons (though they were the most important crew in the South), and in the '90s, their grinding stoner-thrash brew was well-respected and (briefly) commercially viable, but tended to get overlooked. In retrospect, though, they evolved from punk to metal more credibly than just about any other American band, maintaining their political ferocity and uniquely growling Southern-rock undertow. This tour (and recent self-titled album) features C.O.C's original '80s trio line-up, with bassist Mike Dean returning to handle vocals along with drummer Reed Mullin, and the band sounds palpably rejuvenated. Add Miami's menacingly melodic Torche, whose Harmonicraft is the year's most exhilarating rock record to date, and the meditative Bay Area tar-pit duo Black Cobra, and you've got more potential metallic myth-making than an army of Orions.
See Complete Schedule: On their website.

27.Jack White

27/27

Dates: August 3-15
Price: $40-$50
Opening Acts: Not yet announced
Why You Should Go: Real talk, nobody really cares whether any of the songs on Jack White's new album are actually worth inclusion on even a lengthy mixtape of his finest work — "Love Interruption," okay, but after that? The point is for him to go out on the road (for as long as possible) with a band that's not the White Stripes or Raconteurs or Dead Weather, i.e., with him as the sole frontman backed by a drummer who does more than just "provide a context that's essential to the concept" (or whatever). Simply, just be the Rock Star of His Generation That We All Envy and Hate and Want to Ravage or Be Ravaged By in the Back of a Vintage-Chic Tricked-Out Tour Bus. Wait, is this mic on? Are we on the air? Anyway, you probably know the story — he's backed on his 2012 tour dates by separate, crackerjack all-male and all-female bands, and audiences won't know which they're getting until the Detroit-gone-Nashville Wonka Goth Godfather sheepishly struts onstage. See ya at the after-party or in the hotel lobby, etc.
See Complete Schedule: On his website.