This weekend, the Hangout Music Festival storms the beach of Gulf Shores, Alabama, for three days of sun, surf and shenanigans. Grab your suntan lotion and grease up for the 10 acts we're most excited about!

1. Enter Sandbands

1/12

This weekend, the Hangout Music Festival storms the beach of Gulf Shores, Alabama, for three days of sun, surf and shenanigans. The eclectic bill offers everything from dapper indie legends, bass-rocking dubstep darlings, the hot rappers of the moment, and even the godfather of chillwave himself, Steve Winwood! Grab your suntan lotion and grease up for the 10 acts we're most excited about. CHRIS MARTINS

Don't miss our Hangout Fest 2012 sampler, a free download featuring Skrillex, Delta Spirit and more!

2. Enter Sandbands

2/12

This weekend, the Hangout Music Festival storms the beach of Gulf Shores, Alabama, for three days of sun, surf and shenanigans. The eclectic bill offers everything from dapper indie legends, bass-rocking dubstep darlings, the hot rappers of the moment, and even the godfather of chillwave himself, Steve Winwood! Grab your suntan lotion and grease up for the 10 acts we're most excited about. CHRIS MARTINS

Don't miss our Hangout Fest 2012 sampler, a free download featuring Skrillex, Delta Spirit and more!

3. Alabama Shakes

3/12

Inspired by the soul-soaked rock'n'roll pioneered in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, the Shakes offer a welcome window into their native state's rich musical past. But while singer Brittany Howard could command a band of pure R&B revivalists with her beautifully raspy bellow, this quartet eschews retread by lacing its loose grooves with rowdy garage skronk and classic rock stomp. All of that tattered bliss sounds best live, where the Shakes rattle and roll with astounding ease.

4. Big Freedia

4/12

The self-proclaimed queen diva of New Orleans bounce music, Big Freedia (née Freddie Ross) dominates her crowd through hypersexual call-and-response over aggressively upbeat rap tracks while a small army of scantily clad women bobs booties from the stage. It's a lot to take in, but worth every over-stimulated second — the wall between audience and artist quickly dissolves amidst all of that mutual sweat, turning every performance into a party. "Azz Everywhere" or your money back.

5. Gary Clark Jr.

5/12

The guitar solo is back and Gary Clark Jr. might be the reason. This Austin-based singer/axe-slinger has been hailed as the savior of the blues, and it’s no wonder. For Clark, playing isn't about masturbatory might — it's all about emotion. And whether he's singing about being down and out or basking in "Bright Lights," the man brings the audience with him every step of the way. The Black Keys who?

6. The Flaming Lips

6/12

These acid-fried Okies never miss a chance to impress, and Wayne Coyne seems intent on discovering new ways to blow festivalgoers' minds. That the white-suited wizard of weird likes to roll around on top of the audience in his own hamster ball seems normal compared to the rest of it: alien go-go dancers, confetti canons, life-sized UFOs, grooving furries, stage blood, giant vaginas... This time, they'll be playing Dark Side of the Moon beginning to end, no doubt aiming to out-psych Pink Floyd themselves.

7. Gogol Bordello

7/12

That these New York gypsy-punks got their start playing weddings will seem preposterous to anybody who's seen them play in the last 10 years. The generously mustachioed Eugene Hütz is a fiery frontman as apt to spray the front row with red wine as he is with his blood, depending on how intense the performance gets. While his international cast of ragtag players inspires endless clap-alongs, their barking bandleader risks life and limb to keep spirits high.

8. Kaskade

8/12

While Ryan Raddon's every musical move is accompanied by a four-on-the-four pulse, a Kaskade song is never the robotic stuff of vapid Vegas nightlife. Instead, he mines the humanism lurking within deep house, imbuing each song with genuine heart and soul — something his legion of loyal fans understands, and is immediately evident to any who stumble into his live set. The sing-alongs are pleasantly deafening, and the sense of joyful triumph is contagious.

9. Skrillex

9/12

Sonny Moore isn't just the crown prince and American dubstep — in a world of DJs whose idea of crowd work is the occasional fist-pump, he's a bona fide rock star. In between bone-rattling bass drops and mechanized freak-outs, he's been known to stage dive, raft surf, or otherwise rock out to his hard mix of beat-driven electronic skronk.

10. Mavis Staples

10/12

Though she released her debut single in 1956, this 72-year-old soul and gospel legend won a whole new set of fans (and her first Grammy) with 2010's You Are Not Alone, produced by Wilco main brain Jeff Tweedy. The matchup was a natural fit: her transcendently smooth coo and churchly passion plays well with his laidback jangle and love for American roots music. Best of all, the sudden success has got Staples back on the road, where it's clear she's lost nothing over the years.

11. Jack White

11/12

All due respect to his former band, but it's thrilling to see this ex-White Stripe front his handpicked, highly capable new wrecking crew(s). White's solo debut Blunderbuss is consummately Nashville, wrangling blunt-force blues, raggedy rock and sweet soul with the help of seasoned session players. That means arena-ready barnburners like "Sixteen Saltines" and "I'm Shakin'" are tailormade for the live experience. Good thing, since this pale-faced guitar god loves any opportunity to show off.

12. Yelawolf

12/12

A fierce MC with the aggro swagger of Eminem and the tattooed frame of Travis Barker, the Boy from 'Bama is tough to ignore. What's more, this state the charismatic rapper's stomping ground, so it's safe to assume his Southern-fried style will ring truer than ever through the thick local air. Yela's songs sport a hard rock edge and tons of regional references— all Mossberg shotguns and Mossy Oak camo — so when he says "Get the fuck up," best believe it'll happen.