Previously unseen shots of Johnny Ramone onstage, in private moments, and with his famous friends.

1. Johnny and Eddie Vedder Visit the L.A. Dodgers Dugout

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Johnny Ramone lived like he knew he'd be remembered. The legendary Ramones guitarist passed away in 2004, but he left enough notes, journals, lists, photos, and memorabilia that his widow, Linda Ramone, and editor and fan John Cafiero were able to assemble Commando: The Autobiography of Johnny Ramone (Abrams), out April 2. The 176-page, visually-driven book is a treasure trove for Ramones fans. "It's his last word," says Linda. "You can feel his energy in the book." To help share that energy, we've got 10 exclusive images for you, along with Linda's comments about each one. Hey! Ho! Let's go! DAVID MARCHESE

Above: "Johnny and Eddie bonded over baseball," says Linda. "They were huge fans. Eddie is a Chicago Cubs fan and Johnny loved the New York Yankees, but they were both baseball memorabilia collectors. And Johnny would go to games whenever he could. He also watched on TV. When the band was run on the road, he'd call me and make me read him the box scores so he could find out how his fantasy team was doing."

2. Johnny and Eddie Vedder Visit the L.A. Dodgers Dugout

2/11

Johnny Ramone lived like he knew he'd be remembered. The legendary Ramones guitarist passed away in 2004, but he left enough notes, journals, lists, photos, and memorabilia that his widow, Linda Ramone, and editor and fan John Cafiero were able to assemble Commando: The Autobiography of Johnny Ramone (Abrams), out April 2. The 176-page, visually-driven book is a treasure trove for Ramones fans. "It's his last word," says Linda. "You can feel his energy in the book." To help share that energy, we've got 10 exclusive images for you, along with Linda's comments about each one. Hey! Ho! Let's go! DAVID MARCHESE

Above: "Johnny and Eddie bonded over baseball," says Linda. "They were huge fans. Eddie is a Chicago Cubs fan and Johnny loved the New York Yankees, but they were both baseball memorabilia collectors. And Johnny would go to games whenever he could. He also watched on TV. When the band was run on the road, he'd call me and make me read him the box scores so he could find out how his fantasy team was doing."

3. Johnny Recording 'The Ramones,' New York City, February 1976

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"The early days were the best," remembers Linda. "That's when the Ramones changed the world. The band's first three records are the most important ones. That's when they established their sound, their look, and their image. They never wavered from that. Even the Beatles changed. But the Ramones stayed true to being a punk band. All their records are great, but the ones from the early days set the model."

4. Johnny in Uniform With His Father

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As Linda explains, "Johnny worshipped his father [Frank Cummings]. He was a real man's man. A rough-drinking Irishman. Even when Johnny was older, his father would make him stand up in the living room when they were watching baseball and the national anthem came on. His father and John Wayne were Johnny's biggest idols."

5. Live at the Canadian World Music Festival, Toronto, July 2, 1979

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The Ramones were always more successful as innovators and influencers than as a commercial entity, a fact that Johnny reluctantly came to accept. Recalls Linda: "He used to say, 'I'm gonna be in the biggest band in the world.' Realistically once he realized that the radio wasn't playing Ramones songs, he knew that wasn't going to happen." Even so, "he was content because he never compromised to try and get bigger. He never gave up an inch of the music so the band could be more famous."

6. Johnny With the Clash's Joe Strummer, 2002

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"Johnny loved the Clash," says Linda. "He thought they were the second-best punk band of all-time, behind the Ramones. Joe Strummer and Johnny were good friends. In fact, I just saw Lucinda, Joe's widow, the other day. We still keep in touch." Back in the old days, "Johnny thought punk was gonna take over and the Ramones, the Clash, and the Sex Pistols were gonna be as big as the Beatles and the Stones. It just so happens that punk wasn't commercial, which only made it cooler."

7. Live at the Palladium, New York City, January 7, 1978

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According to Linda, Johnny's supremely organized lifestyle transfered over into his buzzsaw guitar style. "He played guitar with the same intensity that he did everything else in his life," she says. "He loved Jeff Beck, but he didn't want to spend his life in his room practicing, trying to play like that. Instead he figured out a way to find his own style. Johnny was never a follower. He was always a leader."

8. Johnny and Linda Visit the Jungle Room at Graceland

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Visiting Elvis Presley's Graceland estate in Memphis was a special trip for Johnny. "He was a huge Elvis fan," shares Linda. "The first time he saw Elvis on TV made Johnny want to be a rock star. [Elvis's daughter] Lisa Marie Presley was a friend of Johnny's and she took us on a private tour. We got to see Elvis's bedroom, which no one gets to see."

9. Johnny With Lisa Marie Presley at her wedding, 2002

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"He was an intense person, but Johnny attracted lots of friends," says Linda. "He was brutally honest with everyone, and people appreciated that. He'd talk to LMP all the time. Henry Rollins, Rob Zombie, Eddie Vedder, they all loved Johnny. People used to ask how liberal people like Eddie and Henry can be good friends with a conservative like Johnny, but as Henry said, 'There's an exception to every rule, and Johnny is the exception.' He was totally unique."

10. Live at the Whiskey a Go Go in Los Angeles, February 16, 1977

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"Johnny was really proud of how great the Ramones were live," reveals Linda. "He wanted people to leave a Ramones show feeling drained because of how intense it was. He wanted to sap you of all your energy."

11. Johnny's Tombstone at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Los Angeles

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Linda tells us that "Johnny wanted to be remembered as three things: Unique, a legend, and as someone who was always right. I used to say, 'Yeah, yeah, whatever' when he would say he was always right, but then he was. And he is right about how he'll be remembered."