Remember when Arcade Fire won that Album of the Year Grammy in 2011, and Twitter saw it as striking some heroic blow for alternative music? Finally an underground band could win at an awards show that had previously given nominations to the White Stripes, Radiohead, Beck, and R.E.M.! Hey, don't get us wrong, we were happy for our chiming Canadian chamber-pop pals, but the fact of the matter is, the Grammys have been sneaking in alternative, underground, and indie voices for 30 years. And whether Arcade Fire's presence is an honor or tokenism, when Sunday rolls around, just don't act like Bon Iver invented beards. That being said, here are 22 of our favorite awesomely alternative Grammy moments!

1. 1975: David Bowie presents an award to Aretha Franklin... and she totally snubs him

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In one of the most cold-blooded moments in Grammy history, notorious diva Aretha Franklin darted right past presenter David Bowie like she was receiving an ice cream sundae and not the Best Female R&B Vocal Performance Grammy. The Thin White Duke (pictured backstage with John Lennon at the ’75 ceremony) admiitted he felt disrespected by Aretha's snub, and the incident was perhaps the catalyst for the emotional turmoil Bowie experienced the next year as he developed his Berlin Trilogy. Well, probably not, but that snub probably hurt his feelings as much as a lollipop to the eye. DANIEL KREPS

2. 1975: David Bowie presents an award to Aretha Franklin... and she totally snubs him

2/23

In one of the most cold-blooded moments in Grammy history, notorious diva Aretha Franklin darted right past presenter David Bowie like she was receiving an ice cream sundae and not the Best Female R&B Vocal Performance Grammy. The Thin White Duke (pictured backstage with John Lennon at the ’75 ceremony) admiitted he felt disrespected by Aretha's snub, and the incident was perhaps the catalyst for the emotional turmoil Bowie experienced the next year as he developed his Berlin Trilogy. Well, probably not, but that snub probably hurt his feelings as much as a lollipop to the eye. DANIEL KREPS

3. 1979: Elvis Costello nominated for Best New Artist

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The Grammy voters pretty much ignored punk — and that’s guessing they even knew it existed — but saw fit to nominate angry young man Elvis Costello, who was never really punk anyway, but hey, this was something. DAVID MARCHESE

4. 1984: Lester Bangs nominated for Best Album Notes for the Fugs' 'Greatest Hits'

4/23

Rock crit's most notorious star — and most glorious crank — got a posthumous nod for his liner notes to a compilation of the anarcho-folkies he dubbed "the first truly underground band in America." DM

5. 1984: Robert Rauschenberg helps Talking Heads win their first Grammy

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Raymond Pettibon, Keith Haring, Basquiat, Robert Longo: The 1980s saw an unparalleled amount of MOMA-worthy artists collaborating with off-the-mainstream artists. But no team-up was as successful in the eyes of Grammy voters as Robert Rauschenberg's work on the limited-edition version of Talking Heads' Speaking in Tongues, which won the Grammy for Best Album Packaging in 1984. Incredibly, this was one of only two Grammys that David Byrne's group would win: Long after the band died, their swell packaging lived on, with their Once In a Lifetime collection nabbing Boxed Set Packaging in 2005. DK

6. 1987: Beastie Boys act like assholes

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The Beasties (pictured backstage at the 1987 Grammys), at the very height of their jerkititude, did everything they could to make it seem like they were booger-wiping punk-rock hooligans crashing a stuffed-shirt party. Asked to present the Best Male Rock Vocal Performance Grammy, they recruited DJ Hurricane to play Public Enemy on a boombox, manhandled the microphone, grabbed their crotches, screamed like Pee-Wee Herman and totally freaked out winner Robert Palmer. Tyler, the Creator could have learned a lot before wussing out on the VMAs. CHRISTOPHER R. WEINGARTEN

7. 1990: The most alt-leaning Best New Artist nominees ever!

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This year, the Academy looked like it was choosing from a college radio playlist: genre-hopping dance crew Soul II Soul, rock-leaning rasp-rapper Tone Loc, the rapcentric pop polyglot Neneh Cherry, and the folkie modern rockers the Indigo Girls. So, of course they went with Milli Vanilli. CW

8. 1991: Sinead O'Connor wins the first Alternative Album Grammy, beating the Replacements

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World's worst Twitter user and acclaimed Pope-ripper Sinead O' Connor rode her smash "Nothing Compares 2 U" to four Grammy nods in 1991, including an Album of the Year nomination for her I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got. While Sinead lost in the big categories, she does have the distinction of becoming the first ever recipient of then-nascent Best Alternative Music Performance category, edging out worthy adversaries like the Replacements' All Shook Down and Kate Bush's The Sensual World. Predictably, O'Connor refused to accept. DK

9. 1992: REM beats out Bob Dylan, Billy Joel, Dire Straits and Garth Brooks for Best Short Form Video

9/23

The '92 Grammys weren't that terrible for Michael Stipe: R.E.M.'s Out of Time lost to Natalie Cole's forgettable Unforgettable in the Album of the Year category, but it did defeat Nirvana's Nevermind in the Alternative category, cementing that 20th anniversary Out of Time cover we ran last year. However, the group's most surprising victory came in the Best Short Form Video, where the MTV favorite "Losing My Religion" video edged out MTV-ignored clips from Grammy-beloved artists like Billy Joel's rendition of "When You Wish Upon a Star" and Bob Dylan's "Series of Dreams." DK

10. 1993: Nine Inch Nails says "fist fuck" in a song, win a Grammy for it

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Trent Reznor’s only (pre-Social Network) Grammy was a Best Heavy Metal Performance win for "Wish," which came as such a surprise, if only for its inclusion of the (post-Tipper) phrase "fist fuck." Reznor would later joke that his epitaph should read: "REZNOR: Died. Said 'fist fuck'. Won a Grammy." DAVID BEVAN

11. 1993: Arrested Development win Best New Artist

11/23

The Recording Academy has a longstanding tradition of rewarding rappers whose albums come without Parental Advisory stickers — how else can you explain Sir Mix-A-Lot's multiple Grammys for "Baby Got Back"? So it's no surprise that in 1993, the era of Doggystyle and Enter the Wu-Tang, Grammy voters aligned themselves with the feel-good rhymes of Atlanta's Sly Stone-sampling Arrested Development. Arrested Development were the first — and remarkably, the last — hip-hop act to ever win a Best New Artist Grammy. And that might only be because their competition that year was Billy Ray Cyrus, Jon Secada, Sophie B. Hawkins, and Kris Kross. DK

12. 1995: Rollins Band play "Liar" in tuxes

12/23

Thanks for the intro, Paul Reiser. Up for best metal performance, the patron saint of soul-gush and his band of jazz-funky longhairs roll out, dapper-as-fuck in tuxedos... and barefoot. Their performance was obviously vein-poppingly sturdy, but the real joy was watching the camera pan to the assembled audience clapping politely. CW

13. 1996: Pearl Jam do their weird non-acceptance speech

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When Pearl Jam frontgrump Eddie Vedder took to the stage to accept the Seattle rockhounds' first Grammy — a Best Rock Performance win for "Spin the Black Circle," the hard-charging single from 1994's Vitalogy — the increasingly spotlight-adverse singer did so in a manner that came to define the band's first 15 years together. "I'm going to say something ‘typically me’ on behalf of all of us," he mumbled, scratching his head. "I don't know what this means. I don't think it means anything. That's just how I feel." Bon Iver's Justin Vernon was 14 at the time. DB

14. 1997: The Fugees defeat 2Pac for Best Rap Album

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As you might have guessed from Arrested Development's Best New Artist win, the Fugees were almost tailor-made for Grammy voters. Tupac, sadly, died Grammy-less. DK

15. 1998: Skeleton Key nominated for Best Recording Package

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The fact that New York's clanging junkyard splatter-pop band Skeleton Key made it to a major label this far after Nirvana's reign was unlikely enough, but they actually got a Grammy nod for the fantastic packaging for 1997's Fantastic Spikes Through Balloon, which featured 81 holes drilled through its cover art. And the winner, Titanic: Music As Heard on the Fateful Voyage, wasn't even shaped like a boat or anything! CW

16. 1998: Los Fabulosos Cadillacs win the first Best Latin Rock/Alternative Album award

16/23

By 1998, the Grammys finally had some vague understanding what "Alternative" meant, since Nirvana's MTV Unplugged, Beck's Odelay, and Radiohead's OK Computer all won in consecutive years. Now clearly experts on the subject, the Grammys introduced the Best Latin Rock/Alternative Album category, and Argentinean ska-fusion troupe Los Fabulosos Cadillacs took home the newfound trophy for their disc Fabulosos Calavera. Just when you thought the Grammys were cool, five years later, voters once again forgot what "Alternative" means and gave the trophy to Shakira. The category was ultimately abandoned last year as the Recording Academy wreaked unholy, quasi-racist havoc on most of their Latin categories. DK

17. 2003: Dave Grohl, Bruce Springsteen, Little Steven, and Elvis Costello perform “London Calling” as a Clash tribute

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It took Joe Strummer's death for the Grammy Awards to give proper due to the Only Band That Matters, though it likely took the Grohl and Springsteen co-signs to make this dream tribute a reality. DM

18. 2005: Basement Jaxx win Best Dance/Electronica Album

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In 2005, the Grammys realized they needed an award that celebrated dance music after years of shoving Chemical Brothers and the Prodigy in the Alternative category. As a result, Best Dance/Electronica Album was born, and the U.K. house duo Basement Jaxx were the first recipients for their acclaimed album Kish Kash. The category continued to feature some of the Grammys' edgier nominees, like LCD Soundsystem, Daft Punk, and even Kraftwerk. But by '07, it watered down its focus and just became another venue to give Madonna and Lady Gaga more trophies. DK

19. 2005: Arcade Fire nominated for their first Grammy

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It was like 2011 never happened. CW

20. 2008: Feist's "1, 2, 3, 4" nominated for Best Solo Pop Performance

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In 2005, Feist was the opening act before whoever was opening for British Sea Power. Two years later, the Broken Social Scenester was a four-time Grammy nominee and performed her hit in front of millions on Music's Biggest Night. Although both "1, 2, 3, 4" and The Reminder failed to capture any awards, it proved the importance of a well-placed iPod commercial. CW

21. 2009: Radiohead play with the USC Marching band

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Go Trojans!

22. 2011: Oh No Ono nominated for Best Record Packaging

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OK, yes, this was the year that Arcade Fire took it all, as you may well know from the dreadful "indie-rock-is-the-new-rock" thinkpieces that poured from blogs like acid rain. But to us, it was way cooler that tiny Danish indie rock troupe Oh No Ono, released on tiny Brooklyn label Friendly Fire got a nom for best record packing for their embossed, ill-sliced, colorful blow-out. CW

23. 2012: Bonny Bear wins big!

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Almost immediately after it'd been announced that his Bon Iver collective (and its self-titled sophomore folk opus) had been nominated for multiple Grammys in December of 2011, Justin Vernon found himself both an underdog and an extreme outsider: previously unreleased transcript from an interview with the New York Times magazine earlier that year caught the one-time Kanye West collaborator questioning the award's significance or his music's place in the proceeding, a sentiment he'd echo, controversially, in the months leading up to ceremony. Which is why it was such a surprise when Vernon would take to the stage twice, nabbing wins for Best Alternative Music Album and Best New Artist over the likes of Radiohead, Nicki Minaj, and Skrillex. D.B.