Marc Hogan

writer

Biography

  • Owen / Photo by Shervin Lainez

    Hear Owen Swim Against Family History on Climactic 'Bad Blood'

    Mike Kinsella's musical pedigree is daunting enough. The Owen singer-songwriter belongs to an Illinois indie-rock family tree that includes his roles in Cap'n Jazz, American Football, and Owls; other related bands include Joan of Arc, Make Believe, Ghosts and Vodka, and the Love of Everything. On "Bad Blood," which appears in the middle of upcoming Owen album L'Ami du Peuple (due out July 2 via Polyvinyl Records), he's more concerned with his actual family lineage.

  • The National, 'Trouble Will Find Me,' cover art

    Hear the National's Gently Pulsing 'Don't Swallow the Cap'

    The National continue to combine their familiar seriousness of purpose with a welcome wryness. The Brooklyn band's drummer, Bryan Devendorf, had said precisely that quality would be there on Trouble Will Find Me, out May 21 via 4AD, and sure enough it glinted through on first studio track "Demons." The latest Trouble cut to surface, "Don't Swallow the Cap," again mixes a dour backdrop — downcast keys, fluttering strings, krautrock pulse — with grimly intoned lyrics that are more fun than you might expect: "There's a time to think about what I wanna say to the girls at the door / I need somewhere to be when I can't get around the river in front of me," Matthew Berninger deadpans, in what sure sounds like a description of a rock singer trying to elude overly adoring fans. The track also features female backing vocals — Devendorf also said Sharon Van Etten, St.

  • Cheyenne Mize / Photo by Bill Brown

    Watch Cheyenne Mize's Arresting 'Among the Grey' Video

    In 2009, Cheyenne Mize released a 10-inch titled Among the Gold with Bonnie "Prince" Billy. But the younger Louisville, Kentucky-born singer and songwriter's upcoming album, Among the Grey, is due out on June 25 via Yep Roc. The painstaking video for the LP's unhurried psych-blues title track covers gold, gray, and all shades in between. Ryan Daly who directs the Louisville Film Society and Flyover Film Festival and is also known as cinemanonymous, hand-tinted the 16mm film frame by frame. It shows, as whorls of color splash across monochromatic performance footage and shots of an umbrella that soon takes a tumble. The song, driven by Mize's forceful vocals and a tight band's roadhouse propulsion, likewise finds human color in a dusty environment.

  • A$AP Rocky, Azealia Banks

    Azealia Banks Implies A$AP Rocky Should 'Come Out of the Closet' After 'Dark Skin Girls' Dis

    Azealia Banks is in the thick of another horrible feud. The New York rapper, who recently has drawn as much attention for her unapologetically sexuality-baiting Twitter commentary as for her increasingly aggro dance-rap, has now questioned A$AP Rocky's sexual orientation. The comments came after her fellow New York rapper was quoted as criticizing a shade of lipstick as inappropriate for darker skin color."Lol @ asap rockys lipstick advice," Banks wrote on Twitter earlier this week. "Some peole should just come out of the closet," she added. When challenged about the "closet" remark, she wrote, "So rocky takes a direct blow to my image about dark skin and purple lipstick, then as soon as I'm ofended ... I' m the bad guy." She called Rocky's comment "hurtful" and said it made her cry.

  • Titus Andronicus

    See Titus Andronicus' 'Local Business' Cover Art That Was Too Hot for XL

    Last year, Titus Andronicus put out an album called Local Business. Musically, it's a raw, punk-scuffed record ready for a band that lost guitar/violin dynamo Amy Klein to take on the road. Lyrically, it's as ambitious as you'd expect from the gang behind Civil War-themed 2010 breakout The Monitor, only now turning their cannons, Das Racist style, on themselves and the scene that had celebrated 'em. Cover art-wise, though, Local Business was, um, lacking. A red square with the title phrase slapped on the bottom, in a font that — we guess — mimics the neon signs in local businesses' storefront windows? All right. But where were the soldiers? The basement-rock setup with the pre-Tea Party "DON'T TREAD ON ME" flag?

  • LL Cool J, Brad Paisley,

    LL Cool J's Other Brad Paisley Collaboration, 'Live for You,' Is a Syrupy Love Ode

    Do ladies still love cool James? It's possible, and the Clear Channel gods could certainly decide that men and women alike should be compelled to keep adoring the pioneering Queens rapper-turned-actor-turned-rapper. But LL Cool J's latest team-up with country singer Brad Paisley, "Live for You," comes across as a lesser slow jam in a rap career unusually packed with heartfelt love songs.It'd be unfair to say this gloopy mix of New-Age ambiance, bluesy twang, new-jack snare cracks, monster-ballad bluster, and contemporary Top 40 Auto-soul is as clumsy about romance as "Accidental Racist," the pair's endlessly discussed collaboration from Paisley's otherwise-worthy new album Wheelhouse, is about race. In fact, LL somehow avoids the type of instantly head-smacking lyrical humdingers that typified his "Racist" verse.

  • How to Destroy Angels

    Watch How to Destroy Angels' Haunting, Artfully Lit Inaugural Live Set

    Trent Reznor's How to Destroy Angels, fresh off debut LP Welcome oblivion, are set to play Coachella this weekend. They warmed up last night with their first-ever live show, at the Fox Theater in Pomona, California, and fan footage of several songs has surfaced online. Those of us without tickets to Indio can consider it an appetizer for the band's Coachella set, which is part of the festival's 2013 YouTube live-streaming lineup. Watch "The Wake Up"/ "Keep It Together," "And the Sky Began to Scream," "The Space in Between," "How Long," "BBB," and "Parasite" below. Neon-tinted colors flash against a curtain reminiscent of the band's wavy, quasi-pixelated album artwork and videos, as the band sounds predictably cutting.

  • Jay-Z

    Jay-Z Holds Class on Cuba, Obama, and Chief Keef on Regal 'Open Letter'

    Jay-Z has spent the past few years finding ways to transcend a hip-hop world where he had hit a ceiling. That meant writing books, releasing opulent collaborative albums out of other MCs' price range, and lending gravitas to Justin Timberlake's new luxury-pop album. Yeah, the Made in America Festival, too. But it also meant high-profile activities outside music: being seen as a peer to the President and First Lady, giving press conferences with Mayor Bloomberg, and owning a stake in the Brooklyn Nets and Barclays Center. Forget all that. With newly shared track "Open Letter," Hov looks to be set on transcending the public-servant realm, as well. Name-checking Obama, Chief Keef, and Bob Dylan (also: Zoolander?!), his magisterial, imperious new rant brushes off questions about his recent Cuba trip with Beyoncé like so much dirt from his shoulder.

  • Justin Timberlake, Michelle Obama, Barack Obama

    See Justin Timberlake and the Obamas' Joyful '(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay' Sing-Along

    There are days when Otis Redding's posthumous 1968 chart-topper "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay" sounds — despite all the lame covers and the nearly infinite variety of weirder, or more personally relevant, or simply more contemporary records in the years before and since — like the greatest song ever. Justin Timberlake's effortlessly suave, polished version at the White House earlier today was exceptional less for the performance than for who witnessed (and joined in on) it. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were both visibly grooving throughout the song, and when The 20/20 Experience falsetto-monger called on them to sing along, the First Couple cheerfully obliged. Unfortunately, although the first hip-hop president has been known to sing now and then, the Obamas' vocals aren't audible in the video above. But their broad smiles certainly are visible.

  • Meek Mill

    Meek Mill Abuses Notorious B.I.G.'s Legend to Defend Rick Ross 'Rape' Lyric

    The Notorious B.I.G. died a little more than 16 years ago, and the pop culture that survived him still hasn't tired of picking his bones. The latest example is rapper Meek Mill, who recently invoked the New York rap legend to defend Maybach Music boss Rick Ross' widely criticized lyric that sure sounds like it's endorsing rape. In an interview with Urban Informer (via AllHipHop), Meek Mill shrugged off concerns about social responsibility as separate from hip-hop. "I don't even care about nobody criticizing no lyrics," he's quoted as saying. "People rap about killing stuff all day. Biggie said, 'Rape your kid. Throw her over the bridge.' It was nothing, it's just hip-hop."Now, the relationship between art — especially hip-hop — and morals is too complicated to untangle here.

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