Marc Hogan

writer

Biography

  • The Knife, Europa Europa,

    The Knife's New Video Will Teach You the 'Political Macarena'

    No, the Knife haven't left behind the high-concept exploration of last year's Shaking the Habitual to revive the most irritating I Love the '90s segments. The Swedish duo is the house band for an "anti-nationalist cabaret" called Europa Europa, created with art group Ful. Premiering in Almedalen, Sweden, on July 1, with performances on the way in the rest of the country heading into its September elections, the cabaret takes aim at Europe's "brutal" migration policies. The first glimpse of the project comes from the video above, for the Swedish-language "För alla namn vi inte får använda" (Google Translate: "For all the names we can not use"). And you know what, compared to much of the Knife's last record, this fidgety, relatively straightforward techno-pop song could almost be played at weddings and sporting events like a certain Los Del Río hit at its peak.

  • Damon Albarn, Blur,

    Damon Albarn's 'Fallon' Visit Soars With Blur's 'This Is a Low'

    Damon Albarn's understated, ornately melancholy Everyday Robots is one of The 50 Best Albums of 2014 So Far, and he made an impressive case last night on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. The big news for longtime fans of the project-hopping British singer and songwriter was that he performed Blur's 1994 Parklife chamber-pop ballad "This Is a Low," and the gentle piano rendering was devastating, as well as in keeping with the new record's intricate intimacy (watch above). But just as arresting was Everyday Robots' "Lonely Press Play" (below).

  • Los Campesinos!,

    Los Campesinos! Soundtrack 'Benny & Jolene' With Alluring 'Little Mouth'

    Last year, Los Campesinos! released No Blues, which depending how you count was the Welsh band's fourth or fifth album since 2008. If you're familiar with their records it shouldn't be a surprise that the album was expertly crafted, raw-nerve guitar pop, witty and heartfelt and oblique in all the right measures — move these guys to Brooklyn from the start and they'd have preempted plenty of Parquet Courts' Pavement think pieces — but what was notable was just how widely the album resonated beyond those who already know every nuance of those records (at least to judge by the complimentary press coverage).Now comes "Little Mouth," recorded before No Blues but arriving in time for the music-themed film it soundtracks, Benny & Jolene.

  • Morrissey, cancels, shows, postpones, tour, Atlantic City, Atlanta

    Morrissey Is Canceling Shows Again, Of Course

    The extent of Morrissey's touring woes has gone beyond the capacity of his song lyrics to describe. In other words, stop us if you think you've heard this reference to the Smiths' "Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before," erm, before. The totemic U.K. singer's 2014 U.S. tour, which kicked off with nary a scheduling glitch last month (unless you ask Scottish noise-pop catharsis-generators PAWS), has run into some predictable calendar changes.Earlier this week, Moz canceled a show in Atlanta, his fourth missed date in that city in the past 18 months. On Facebook, the former Smiths singer's camp cited a virus. Now, Morrissey has announced that the virus has forced a postponement of the June 6 show at Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J., which will be rescheduled for June 22.

  • Tomahawk, Mike Patton,

    Mike Patton Flaunts Vocal Range on Tomahawk's Sizzling 'M.E.A.T.'

    Tomahawk still have some art-rock leftovers from last year's Oddfellows. Luckily, they're still good reheated. With Faith No More vocalist extraordinaire Mike Patton plus members of Jesus Lizard and Battles, the toothsome four-piece recently released the non-album single "M.E.A.T.," backed with "Curtain Calls," via Ipecac (you can download it from iTunes). Now both tracks have made their way to YouTube, and coincidentally enough, they give Patton a chance to exercise his Axl Rose-besting vocal cords. The A-side is schizoid thrasher, Patton careening from a goblin growl to an angelic coo as he puns, "We gotta make ends meet." The B-side is looser and more subdued, with Patton's vocals relegated to a wordless hum. All this comes as Faith No More hint at the chance of new music. Let's assume the meat is soy and we can all nosh.

  • Spoon, 'They Want My Soul'

    Spoon's First Album Since 2010, 'They Want My Soul,' Escapes in August

    Spoon have shed a little light on the follow-up to 2010's sleeper triumph Transference. The Austin, Texas indie-rock heroes have been teasing something for June 10 with the words "R.I.P.," and what that is still remains unclear. On August 5, though, they'll release new album They Want My Soul via new label home Loma Vista (that marks a departure from longtime label Merge). Over at NPR, hear snippets of new songs "Knock Knock Knock," "Inside Out," the title track, and a cover of Ann-Margret's "I Just Don't Understand," a 1961 song that frontman Britt Daniel said he recorded for Rookie but opted to save for the album. For They Want My Soul, Spoon worked with outside producers for the first time, starting the project with Joe Chiccarelli (Morrissey, My Morning Jacket) and wrapping it up with Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, MGMT, Sparklehorse).

  • How to Dress Well,

    How to Dress Well Leads a Shamanic Funeral in Eerie 'Face Again' Video

    How to Dress Well mastermind Tom Krell is a shifting presence in the videos from his upcoming album"What Is This Heart?" (due out June 24 via Weird World). The spectral, intimately atmospheric song-weaver played a convenience store clerk and a doctor in the video for the record's stunning "Repeat Pleasure." That clip was the first in a trilogy directed by Johannes Greve Muskat. Now comes the second installment, for the astral-pop tour de force "Face Again." Here Krell plays, as he puts it on Twitter, a "benevolent shaman," who guides the young-couple protogonists as they light a funeral pyre for a lost loved one. The video trilogy will screen in full at How to Dress Well's record release party, set for the Slipper Room in New York on June 10.

  • Interpol, 'El Pintor,' fifth album, Brandon Curtis, Secret Machines

    Interpol's First Album in Four Years, 'El Pintor,' Painted for September

    Interpol are playing with anagrams and foreign languages as they announce their first album in four years, the stylishly moody New York trio's fifth overall. On September 9, Matador Records will release El Pintor, the follow-up to 2010's Interpol (which, well, look at the new album's title, and then look at that one again).Singer-guitarist Paul Banks, guitarist-pianist Daniel Kessler, and drummer Samuel Fogarino recorded the 10-track set at New York City's Electric Lady Studios and Atomic Sound after a two-and-a-half-year rest from touring. Banks, for the first time, also plays bass on the album. The Secret Machines frontman Brandon Curtis plays keyboards on all but one song. That might be "Tidal Wave," which features keyboards from Roger Joseph Manning Jr, a member of Beck's backing band and co-founder of Jellyfish.

  • Bob Mould, Chrissie Hynde, Afghan Whigs

    Bob Mould, Chrissie Hynde, Afghan Whigs Storm Late-Night TV

    It was an evening for left-of-center rock icons on TV last night. Bob Mould, the trailblazing singer and guitarist from Hüsker Dü and Sugar, performed the power-pop kiss-off "I Don't Know You Anymore," off of new album Beauty & Ruin, on Conan (watch that above). Pretenders frontwoman Chrissie Hynde did the breezy, Peter Bjorn & John-informed "You or No One," from her June 10 Stockholm, on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (below). And the Afghan Whigs visited Late Show With David Letterman to tear out the jagged, nervy "Matamoros," from the R&B punks' first album in 16 years, Do to the Beast (scroll down). After the Whigs' ferocious performance, it's worth revisiting their mid-'90s Letterman take on "Going to Town."  

  • Don Henley, Frank Ocean, Okkervil River, stealing, copyright

    Don Henley, Still Awful, Says Frank Ocean and Okkervil River Stole

    UPDATE: Okkervil River's Will Sheff has responded to Don Henley's comments via an essay at Rolling Stone, beginning, "I woke to the news that Don Henley was 'not impressed' with me. OK..." He saliently addresses the issue of ownership and "stealing" here: "This is what artists are supposed to do — communicate back and forth with each other over the generations, take old ideas and make them new (since it's impossible to really 'imitate' somebody without adding anything of your own), create a rich, shared cultural language that was available to everybody." Read the rest there and catch the back story below.In 1974, Linda Ronstadt's former backing band (though not the one that recorded her classic "Different Drum") put out a song called "Ol' 55" on their album On the Border. That band, of course, was the Eagles, and the track was a cover.

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Now Playing
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