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    Why He's Called... Buck 65

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" in which we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some of our favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Cult fave rapper Buck 65, whose 20 Odd Years, featuring guest vocals from Islands' Nick Thorburn, is out February 20. The quirky MC will also be playing the South By Southwest Music Festival in mid-March. Why Buck 65: "When I left my hometown of Mt. Uniacke in Nova Scotia, Canada, I ended up dumping a lot of my personal possessions on my father," says the rapper, whose real name is Richard Terfry. "But having all this shit in his house was driving him crazy. It was there for a decade.

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    Why They're Called... Chiodos

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Bassist Matt Goddard of Chiodos, whose Illuminaudio cracked the Billboard Top 40 album chart upon its release in October. The band launches a co-headlining tour with Emarosa on February 15th in Jacksonville, Florida. Why Chiodos: "Yeah, like ten years ago in Davison, Michigan, I was watching Killer Klowns from Outer Space -- it's a great b-movie horror film produced by the Chiodo brothers," says Goddard. "We had a talent show coming up that the band was going to play and we had to come up with a name. So I was watching the movie, looked at the back of the box, and saw the name Chiodo. I just added an S. We were all big fans-- the Chiodos brothers also did Critters.

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    EXCLUSIVE: New Lykke Li Song!

    Swedish ingénue Lykke Li's breakout debut album, 2008's Youth Novels, was full of quirky and melodic dance-pop that was stylish, bubbly, and irresistible â€" the singer landed prime gigs at festivals all over the world, was remixed by Drake, and placed a song on the hit soundtrack to 2009's Twilight sequel New Moon. But on her follow-up, Wounded Rhymes, produced by Peter Bjorn & John's Bjorn Yttling and due March 1, the 24-year-old singer has gone deeper and darker. Proving that sexy, throbbing lead-off single, "Get Some" was no aberration, "I Follow Rivers," premiering here exclusively on SPIN.com, is a moody mid-tempo jam propelled by a noirish guitar line, swirling keyboards, and thumping percussion. Listen below! "I think I sound more experienced," said Lykke Li when we spoke with her about the new album. "I'm always trying to do something different.

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    Why He's Called... Iron and Wine

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Iron & Wine's Sam Beam, whose stellar new album, Kiss Each Other Clean, is due January 25, the same date that the Austin, Texas, singer-guitarist begins his winter tour. Why Iron & Wine: "Back in '98 or so when I was in film school I was working on lighting for a movie in Georgia, out in the middle of nowhere at a gas station," recalls songwriter-mastermind Sam Beam. "Inside the gas station they had a bunch of old home remedies like castor oil, and one of them was a protein supplement called Beef, Iron & Wine. I just dropped the Beef part. I recognized that a lot in my writing I'm trying to show both sides of the coin -- the sour and sweet.

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    Why They're Called... Cut Copy

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Melbourne, Australia, synth-pop stars Cut Copy, whose much anticipated new album, their third,Zonoscope, is due February 8. Why Cut Copy: "I was working at my day job at the graphic design company I owned back in Melbourne in 2001," says vocalist-keyboardist Dan Whitford, "and I remember being on my MacBook. I was in the edit menu and I moved down in the document to the few words that didn't make sense together, and at that particular day and time the words 'cut' and 'copy' really stood out to me. There are no other variables to the story. On a different day, I might have thought Edit Delete was a great name for the band. The other guys were receptive to the name.

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    Why They're Called... The Dismemberment Plan

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Beloved Washington, D.C., quartet the Dismemberment Plan, who in January will reunite for their first tour in seven years to support the vinyl reissue of their indie 1999 classic Emergency & I. Why Dismemberment Plan: "The [1993] movie Groundhog Day was out when we were just starting to play together," recalls singer-guitarist Travis Morrison. "Like most young bands we had about 75,000 possible names written on a piece of paper, but I remember going to see that movie in Williamsburg, Virginia, and there's a part where an insurance salesman is talking to Bill Murray's character and mentions the death and dismemberment plan.

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    Why They're Called... A Day to Remember

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Florida punk-metal quintet A Day to Remember, whose fourth album What Separates Me from You, released November 16, debuted at No. 11 on the Billboard Top 200 album chart. In March, the band will embark on its Game Changers tour with Bring Me the Horizon, We Came As Romans, and Pierce The Veil. Why A Day to Remember: "It came from the old drummer, Bobby," explains guitarist Kevin Skaff. "This was a long-ass time ago back in Ocala, Florida - probably 2003. Bobby had this girlfriend and she just randomly blurted the name out during a practice of something.

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    Success of the Year: Little Big Bands

    Alex Ebert, the bearded, altogether Jesus-y frontman for psych-pop merry pranksters Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, has a not unreasonable theory. "Facebook is popular because we all want friends," he says, "but we exist in three-dimensional bodies. We were put on Earth to experience more than cyberspace community, and that takes time to build. That's what makes it special." He would know. For the Zeros, English folk-rockers Mumford & Sons, and anthemic Australians the Temper Trap, 2010 was defined by patience, persistence, word of mouth, and surprising success. Mumford's Sigh No More (Glassnote) sold 316,000 copies. The Zeros' Up From Below (Community/Vagrant) sold 160,000, and the band played to overflow crowds at Coachella, Sasquatch, and Lollapalooza. The Temper Trap earned 96,000 in sales of Conditions (Glassnote), and sold another 528,000 individual digital tracks.

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    Jack Black Picks His Top Holiday Jams

    While filming the upcoming movie Gulliver's Travels (in theaters December 22), stars Jason Segel and Jack Black got in such a holiday spirit, the duo decided to team up for a reworking of the 1977 Bing Crosby-David Bowie duet "Peace on Earth / Little Drummer Boy." The song — which you can watch in animated form below — just hit the web this week, with U.S. proceeds of its sales on iTunes benefitting Blue Star Families, a charity supporting military families. "The original version is pretty mellow," says Black. "So we delivered the sweet nectar of the rock gods." In honor of Black's Christmas gift, SPIN asked him to run down his favorite holiday jams. Check out his picks below. And for more of the most rockin' holiday tunes, check out SPIN's holiday playlist here. Bruce Springsteen, "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town"I guess I would give the top spot to this one.

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    Why They're Called... The Get Up Kids

    Welcome to the weekly SPIN.com feature "Name That Band!" inwhich we get the inside stories behind the mysterious monikers of some ofour favorite artists. (See past episodes of Name That Band! here.) This week: Legendary emo trailblazers the Get Up Kids, whose hotly anticipated new album There Are Rules is due January 25 -- it's their first since 2004. Why The Get Up Kids: "We used to rehearse in a warehouse space above a drum store in Kansas City," says singer-guitarist Matt Pryor, thinking back to the band's 1995 genesis. "One day we were in there throwing possible band names around and I said something about the band I was in previously: the Suburban Get Up Kids. We all kind of liked that, but I'd been in three other bands already that had names that started with 'S' and all three broke up pretty quickly. There was Sevasch, Secular Theme, and Secret Decoder Ring.

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