Reviews - Page 5

Review: Jens Lekman Is Still Yours Truly on Life Will See You Now

What is a Jens Lekman? It doesn’t come in any of the usual colors or shapes. It bristles with complicated angles and mechanisms. It’s hard…
Brian Howe / February 16, 2017

Review: Matt Jencik’s Weird Times Is Ambient Music for the Impending Apocalypse

Weird Times, the title of the debut solo album by journeyman experimental musician Matt Jencik, contains an uncommon politicization of a word that usually brings…
Andy Cush / February 10, 2017

Review: Blur – Blur

This piece first ran in the February 1997 issue of Spin. In honor of the album turning 20 this year, and our feature on the…
Jonathan Bernstein / February 10, 2017

Review: Julie Byrne’s Not Even Happiness Is a Truly Beautiful Travel Album

Sometimes, simply pairing the right voice with the right reverb can create a song’s power. There have been endless notable examples since the effect came…
Winston Cook-Wilson / February 7, 2017

Review: Allison Crutchfield Finds Her Own Way on Solo Debut Tourist in This Town

Allison Crutchfield’s first full-length album as a solo artist opens with a resigned and comforting sigh. It’s a prologue that sounds like an elegy: "When…
Anna Gaca / February 3, 2017

Review: Sampha Finds Beauty Within the Process

In prior interviews, Sampha Sisay made it clear that he was content with being a supporting player, a lane in which he proved…
Brian Josephs / February 3, 2017

Kehlani’s SweetSexySavage Argues That There’s More to Modern R&B Than Sadboy Jerkoffs

In 2016, R&B as an industry revealed itself to be deeply image obsessed. You can trace this back to the rise of the Weeknd, who…
Jordan Sargent / February 1, 2017

Review: Ty Segall’s Second Self-Titled Album Continues His Torrential Creative Streak

Musical mission statement, self-imposed milestone, alter-ego autobiography: The eponymous LP plays an invaluable role in contextualizing an artist’s discography, as well as their identity writ…
Zoe Camp / January 30, 2017

Review: It’s Worth Listening to the Rest of Migos’ Culture, Too

When Atlanta's Migos released "Versace" in 2013--and in the following year, in which the trio's unmistakable triplet raps began to rule hip-hop on a global scale--it was hard…
Winston Cook-Wilson / January 27, 2017

Review: Priests’ Nothing Feels Natural Is Vital Post-Punk for Trump’s America

Anyone who’s said "at least a Trump presidency will make punk rock great again" hasn’t been paying attention to Priests, the D.C. band who’ve been…
Nina Mashurova / January 27, 2017

Review: Japandroids Bring Beautiful Noise on Near to the Wild Heart of Life

There are Japandroids fans who talk about their memories of the band like veterans reminiscing about fighting in the Great War, and that nostalgia is not…
Jeremy Gordon / January 27, 2017

Review: Foxygen’s Hang Revives the Retro Simplicity of Their Best Work

For an act once steeped in psychedelia, Foxygen have always had a clear-eyed presence. Back in 2013, the alleged ambassadors of Peace &…
Rob Arcand / January 20, 2017

Review: On Love If Possible, Shintaro Sakamoto Makes Perfectionist Pop for the Extraterrestrial Bachelor Pad

In the late 1950s and early ‘60s--the space age that spawned The Jetsons and brought hi-fi stereos into countless suburban living rooms--Americans were infatuated with…
Andy Cush / January 17, 2017

Review: On I See You, The xx Are Finally Comfortable in Their Own Skin

I See You, the xx’s first album in a little over four years, does not herald a new direction for a group that stumbled into…
Jordan Sargent / January 13, 2017

Camp Lo’s On the Way Uptown Is 2017’s First Great Music Release

Jay Z's 1996 debut, Reasonable Doubt, still doubles as the modern hustler's code of ethics, even if it wasn't an instant smash: It didn't go platinum until…
Brian Josephs / January 9, 2017
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