Reviews - Page 3

Review: The Raveonettes’ 2016 Atomized Is an Satisfying Dark Dive Into the Night

Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo’s retro noise-pop duo the Raveonettes have a rep for consistency: They rarely deviate from their primary influences (an equal and…
Anna Gaca / April 20, 2017

Review: Actress’ AZD Is a Gleaming Capstone on His Last Decade of Music

AZD, Darren Jordan Cunningham’s fifth album of experimental club music under the Actress moniker, waits for about four minutes before introducing its first beat. That…
Andy Cush / April 18, 2017

Review: On DAMN., Kendrick Lamar Is Not Your Prophet

The salvation of the New Testament is preceded by the judicious wrath of the Old—the stories of genocidal floods, generational curses, violent plagues, and God’s…
Brian Josephs / April 17, 2017

Review: You Know Exactly What The Chainsmokers’ Memories…Do Not Open Sounds Like

It isn’t exactly Dylan going electric, as far as career reinventions go, but a small sliver of pop music history is currently being infiltrated by…
Jordan Sargent / April 10, 2017

Review: Joey Bada$$ Figures Himself Out on All-Amerikkkan Bada$$

At this point, it’s normal to read an artist’s attempt to lean into political consciousness with skepticism, but Joey Bada$$’ specifically worded social critiques shouldn’t be…
Brian Josephs / April 10, 2017

Review: The Chemical Brothers – Dig Your Own Hole

The Chemical Brothers' Dig Your Own Hole was released April 7, 1997. Charles Aaron's review originally ran in the May 1997 issue of SPIN. In honor of the…
Charles Aaron / April 7, 2017

Review: Sleater-Kinney – Dig Me Out

Sleater-Kinney's third album, Dig Me Out, was released on April 8, 1997 by Kill Rock Stars. Ann Powers' review originally ran in the June 1997 issue of Spin. In honor…
Ann Powers / April 7, 2017

Review: Arca’s Self-Titled Album Is His Most Engaging, Emotionally Draining, and Confrontational Record Yet

While Alejandro Ghersi already had amassed production credits ranging from FKA twigs and Kelela to Kanye by the time he turned 25, it was his…
Andy Beta / April 6, 2017

Review: Father John Misty’s Pure Comedy Isn’t as Interesting As His Persona

Josh Tillman, aka Father John Misty, is something of a rarity—a bona fide indie rock star in an era where the relevance of what we…
Jeremy Gordon / April 6, 2017

Review: Julia Holter’s Live Album In the Same Room Brings Out the Richest Qualities in Her Work

If you think about the lengthy tour cycles independent artists embark on these days--for either the love of doing so, or at least the love…
Winston Cook-Wilson / April 5, 2017

Review: On The Far Field, Future Islands Struggle With the Limits of Their Signature Sound

Future Islands practice a kind of synth-pop asceticism. Over four albums and eleven years, the beloved Baltimore band have worked exclusively with a…
Andy Cush / April 5, 2017

Review: Bob Dylan’s Sprawling Standards Album Triplicate Highlights His Idiosyncratic Charms

In the middle of the last century, pop vocal albums consisting of selections from the "Great American Songbook"--made-for-market pop tunes published between the late 1920s…
Winston Cook-Wilson / March 31, 2017

Review: Goldfrapp Aren’t Having Fun on Silver Eye, But Their Disco Dystopia Fits the Times

Somewhere between the throbbing second track on Goldfrapp's new album Silver Eye ("Systemagic") and the slinky third ("Tigerman"), you'll wonder why Goldfrapp haven't recorded a…
Anna Gaca / March 30, 2017

Review: The Jesus and Mary Chain Correct Their Course on the Satisfying Damage and Joy

Just think of the legacy of Jim and William Reid, the two brothers helming the Jesus and Mary Chain for more than 30 years of hurts-so-good…
Dale Eisinger / March 28, 2017

Review: On the Pummeling Heartless, Pallbearer Haven’t Softened

It’s taken Arkansas doom outfit Pallbearer just eight years to clamber out from the underground and onto the sacred dais we like to call "the…
Zoe Camp / March 24, 2017
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