Reviews - Page 2

Review: Priests’ Nothing Feels Natural Is Vital Post-Punk for Trump’s America

Anyone who’s said "at least a Trump presidency will make punk rock great again" hasn’t been paying attention to Priests, the D.C. band who’ve been…
Nina Mashurova / January 27, 2017

Review: Japandroids Bring Beautiful Noise on Near to the Wild Heart of Life

There are Japandroids fans who talk about their memories of the band like veterans reminiscing about fighting in the Great War, and that nostalgia is not…
Jeremy Gordon / January 27, 2017

Review: Foxygen’s Hang Revives the Retro Simplicity of Their Best Work

For an act once steeped in psychedelia, Foxygen have always had a clear-eyed presence. Back in 2013, the alleged ambassadors of Peace &…
Rob Arcand / January 20, 2017

Review: On Love If Possible, Shintaro Sakamoto Makes Perfectionist Pop for the Extraterrestrial Bachelor Pad

In the late 1950s and early ‘60s--the space age that spawned The Jetsons and brought hi-fi stereos into countless suburban living rooms--Americans were infatuated with…
Andy Cush / January 17, 2017

Review: On I See You, The xx Are Finally Comfortable in Their Own Skin

I See You, the xx’s first album in a little over four years, does not herald a new direction for a group that stumbled into…
Jordan Sargent / January 13, 2017

Camp Lo’s On the Way Uptown Is 2017’s First Great Music Release

Jay Z's 1996 debut, Reasonable Doubt, still doubles as the modern hustler's code of ethics, even if it wasn't an instant smash: It didn't go platinum until…
Brian Josephs / January 9, 2017

Review: On RTJ3, Run the Jewels’ Revolutionary Heart Is Still Beating Strong

"No struggle feels futile to the one who’s struggling," musician Tunde Olaniran wrote in his 2015 sci-fi short story "Little Brown Mouse." Describing a mouse…
Brian Josephs / January 4, 2017

Review: Nine Inch Nails’ Not the Actual Events Is a Good Sign for What’s to Come in 2017

"Yes … everyone seems to be asleep," Trent Reznor whispers at the opening of the ostentatiously-titled "Dear World," the second song on the new Nine…
Winston Cook-Wilson / January 3, 2017

Review: Childish Gambino Is Actually Good Now

With this year's debut of Atlanta, the delicately-crafted and critically-acclaimed FX series about black life in miniature is what brought Donald Glover to light as an auteur,…
Brian Josephs / December 5, 2016

Review: The Weeknd’s Starboy Offers the Same Old Lechery Between Great Pop Singles

The Weeknd’s new album extends to you a simple deal. You can, with ease, accept two handfuls of the finest pop songs that the great, whirring…
Jordan Sargent / November 29, 2016

Review: Metallica’s Hardwired… To Self-Destruct Definitely Should Not Be a Double Album

A year after the release of 2008’s Death Magnetic, Metallica were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The two things weren’t necessarily…
Brandon Stosuy / November 23, 2016

Review: PC Music Struggles With Identity and Grows Up on New Comp

The strangest thing about the PC Music dance collective is how little dancing is actually done when it's played in the club. This was most apparent…
Rich Juzwiak / November 21, 2016

Review: A Tribe Called Quest’s Vital Final Album Reminds Us the Journey Continues

In the ‘80s, jazz finally went legitimate. Once considered a lesser means of expression due to America’s adulation of Eurocentric culture, the African-American tradition became…
Brian Josephs / November 14, 2016

Review: Body/Head Draw Narrative From Noise on Impressive Live Album No Waves

No Waves, the title of the second album by Body/Head, presents a double entendre. One meaning is referential: no wave, a nod to the 1970s…
Andy Cush / November 11, 2016

Review: Lambchop Wring Pathos and Humor Out of the Machine on FLOTUS

If you’ve puzzled over 22, A Million one too many times (or sat through Justin Vernon’s explanatory, 90-minute press conference), you…
Winston Cook-Wilson / November 3, 2016
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